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Thread: Thinking of trying localvore page

  1. #1
    Dualhammers's Avatar
    Dualhammers is offline Senior Member
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    Primal Fuel


    I've noticed that the prices for produce rise a lot during the winter. This is obviously because these veggies have to be shipped in from places like California. Well these big planes put lots of pollutants into the air I'd rather not be there. Why not support a healthy environment by eating like Grok did?


    My goal is to only eat the things I could naturally find during the winter - with some modifications. This will include eggs, meat, and some veggies that could survive the harsh winter months (onions, squashes in limited amounts, etc).


    Any other takers?


  2. #2
    Diana Renata's Avatar
    Diana Renata is offline Senior Member
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    I've pretty much been doing this since becoming a regular shopper at my local farmers market- which is now open year-round.


    It's not that difficult, especially if you get the chance to freeze, dry or can your surplus. I've got some carrots and squash in the freezer. If I run out, I'll be going carnivore until spring.


    In my kitchen I have a 7.2 cubic ft freezer full of beef and pork (cow/pig-pooling) and I've been buying my eggs from the Amish neighbors since spring.


    It's pretty easy, once you get the hang of it. It's a great way to live. I highly recommend it.


  3. #3
    onelasttime's Avatar
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    I've been working on this over the past year and a half - before primal. I joined a couple of great community shared agriculture (CSA) farms that supply local organic veggies, fruits, herbs and meats.


    The winter shares are all stored veggies and fruits from the summer (onions, potatoes, squashes, leeks, garlic, turnip, parsnips, cabbage and apples). I was first concerned about how to keep the carbs down but now I've stopped worrying. This bounty is so much better than the diet I had before so I'm not stressing.


  4. #4
    Acmebike's Avatar
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    Already on board, eating from a locally procured beef, game meat and organs, lots of organs. I also am lucky enough to get raw dairy (butter, and cream) and eggs. This time of year, the dairy and eggs are likely not fed ideally, but the beef and game are my staples.


    This is a great idea, eat 75% of your diet from local sources! I think I could do 100% if I never socialized....


  5. #5
    Annika's Avatar
    Annika is offline Senior Member
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    I have been a striving localvore for the past year and a half; I have documented (some of) my adventures in localvorism on my blog, Northeast Kingdom Localvores (http://neklocalvores.wordpress.com). I've done a few local-eating challenges, one for a month, which made me more aware of my eating/cooking patterns and what I could change to reduce my carbon footprint and support my local community. Looking back through my all-local meals, it's funny to see them change after reading GCBC and discovering MDA - we used to have potatoes almost every day, and now we have them once every couple of weeks. The lack of locally grown grains was a real problem during an eat-local challenge, and now - who cares? I'm lucky to live in Vermont, where we have abundant local dairy, eggs, meat, and, most of the year, veggies. But our growing season is short, and by now I'm buying California veggies again. Going without green veggies and cauliflower is not something I want to do. In the summer and fall, I would guess that 80% of what I eat is grown or raised within my county.

    My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
    On Twitter: @NEKLocalvore

  6. #6
    Dualhammers's Avatar
    Dualhammers is offline Senior Member
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    Awesome! I will definitely check out that block and look into doing this. Unfortunately I am living in a really tiny apartment for the next year and a half so I don't have the luxury of space (or money to buy) a huge freezer, but I am sure I can make due.


  7. #7
    paleo_piper's Avatar
    paleo_piper is offline Junior Member
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    I try to eat 80-90% of my food locally. Which means I'm going to be mostly carnivore for the winter since the only veggies available are potatoes, turnips, rutabega and beets. My farmer's market it closed seasonally too, they won't be open again until May. I'm already jonesing for a peach but it might be a full year. At least there's still pasture-raised meats and grass-fed dairy. Pasture-raised eggs... eh. Infrequently. The farm I buy from, their chickens are molting so they don't have as many eggs.


  8. #8
    NorthernMonkeyGirl's Avatar
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    I really like the concept, but there is a issue in that the "local food" shops here cater for the discerning customer. You know, the ones with two pet ponies, 3.5 organic children, and a small business selling home-knitted aprons.....


    If I'm in a supermarket, the least I can do is buy British or English!


    I was hoping to rely on home reared meat, but none will go for slaughter for months now. I may get half a beast from a nearby source.


    Onelasttime, have you counted the carbs at all? I'm wary of all the winter squashes on this basis. I'm very sensitive, and also once I start on higher carbs it's an upward spiral (occasionally as far as chocolate and cake!!)


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