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    Brent*'s Avatar
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    protein intake question

    Primal Fuel
    So I weight 215lb want to get down to around 190-200lb. So I want to eat around 150-175g of protein a day. If I have 3 square meals, how do I get 50g of protein at each meal? I know this sounds crazy, but sometimes I have a hard time even getting close to that. For instance, for breakfast I'll have some scrambled eggs, maybe some bacon and/or sausage. I would have to have about 6 eggs and a few slices of bacon to get that total, right? Just seems like a lot. I could definitly eat it (as I do get hungry around 10am (I eat around 7am).

    Lunch is difficult as well. From Mark's recipes, some of them don't come close to 50g of protein. I guess it seems like I would have to eat a lot to get my 150g of protein a day. Maybe I'm actually not eating enough.

    also, for energy purposes as I get fatigued quickly (hell I wake up tired), do we get the majority of our energy from fat or protein? I might have to really up my fat intake, because I may not be eating too much which is why I get tired so easily.

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    Pick up some protein powder, its debated that its not as effective as protein from meat and such, (probably isn't) But it is what I do. I got some GNC whey protein I drink a scoop of it with water at lunch with my salad and after my workout, each scoop is 28g of protein. You could do 3-4 scoops one with each meal, but I don't because I am only 150lbs. It gets me in the 100-120g range each day and seems to be effective. Good Luck!

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    Apex Predator's Avatar
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    Don't use protein powder, it spikes your insulin. Eat larger portions of meat.

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    I found it very tricky at first, but really helpful to have 50+ grams of protein at breakfast. Leaner meats can be helpful. Traditional "breakfast meats" (modern American traditions that is) are very high fat, so you can get too full before hitting 50 grams. Lately I've just been eating dinner style food 2-3 times per day. Typical breakfast is 3 fried eggs and 3-4 oz meat or fish, or 6-8 oz meat/fish only. Meat is usually beef, e.g., a roast, and for fish I do sardines canned in olive oil. Sometimes I have vegetables too. Took a few days to get used to, but it really keeps you going. Lunch feels completely optional now.

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    Sure you can avoid protein powder if you want, but I don't see how whey isolate protein powder can be that much worse than an insulin spike from the protein from meats, obviously meat > powder but to completely disregard it for causing a insulin spike is stupid. Whey isolate protein contains 3g of carbs in a serving ( 28 g of protein). I can guarantee you it has a very minimal raise on the blood sugar, assuming you buy the right kind of course.

    And yeah it isn't 100% primal but if you are going to be that much of a nazi about your eating then there are underlying psychological issues with you tbh.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PingPrime21 View Post
    Sure you can avoid protein powder if you want, but I don't see how whey isolate protein powder can be that much worse than an insulin spike from the protein from meats, obviously meat > powder but to completely disregard it for causing a insulin spike is stupid. Whey isolate protein contains 3g of carbs in a serving ( 28 g of protein). I can guarantee you it has a very minimal raise on the blood sugar, assuming you buy the right kind of course.

    And yeah it isn't 100% primal but if you are going to be that much of a nazi about your eating then there are underlying psychological issues with you tbh.
    You don't see because you haven't done any research, you're just guessing-with someone else's health. In this case, you guess wrong. Liquid protein, especially whey(which is most protein shakes) *skyrockets* insulin much like sugar. That's why people drink them after working out, to max out their insulin levels to take advantage of the anabolic properties of insulin(bodybuilders will even inject themselves with insulin intended for diabetics for this reason). That's fine after working out when your muscles are sensitized to insulin, but a nightmare in a rested state, where it will store fat and negatively impact BS levels.

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    I have been using whey isolate for years, I get roughly 1/3rd of my protein daily from it. My daily diet is roughly as follows.

    Breakfast - 3 eggs omelet, with a can of tuna, green/red peppers, broccoli and onions mixed in.
    ~ 40g protein

    Lunch - Big salad with either fish, chicken, or hamburger sliced up into my salad and a scoop of isolate in water.
    ~ 15g + 28g = 43g protein

    After workout ( usually a few hours after lunch, sometimes late at night after work)
    ~ 28g + 5g (handful of almonds or sunflower seeds) = 33g protein

    Dinner - Steak, chicken or fish and veggies ( my fish is white fish caught by myself so I do not know the exact values but its a good estimate)
    ~ 35-40g


    Total 140-150ish this is my average daily intake it varies somedays if I skip a meal or whatever.

    So 1/3rd is coming from the isolate and has been for years and I have have seen fantastic results. I am 150lbs, lean and around 10-15% body fat ( estimate I look good thats all that matters never had a test done) . You are going to come in and completely shun something I have been using with great results for years? I see it as something that the OP could greatly benefit from especially with the amount of protein he is trying to get. Want to knock my eating of nuts too?

    I understand you might may not agree with the use of the protein powder and thats cool but to completely disregard it for someone who defiantly sounds like could benefit from it just does not sit well with me especially when I have had success incorporating it into my diet.
    Last edited by PingPrime21; 09-26-2011 at 03:50 PM.

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    Bear's Avatar
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    Why drink protein shake "after" working out...and not before. I've been doing so before...seems to help the workout. Using whey isolate (Primal Fuel).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Apex Predator View Post
    You don't see because you haven't done any research, you're just guessing-with someone else's health. In this case, you guess wrong. Liquid protein, especially whey(which is most protein shakes) *skyrockets* insulin much like sugar. That's why people drink them after working out, to max out their insulin levels to take advantage of the anabolic properties of insulin(bodybuilders will even inject themselves with insulin intended for diabetics for this reason). That's fine after working out when your muscles are sensitized to insulin, but a nightmare in a rested state, where it will store fat and negatively impact BS levels.
    Wait, what? Apex - c'mon dude. Awhile back (like 5 years ago) I used to test my glucose after meals and insulin never "skyrocketed" after a whey protein shake (usually IsoPure or Metabolic Drive - referred to as Low-Carb Grow back then). At least the glucometer never showed any high amounts of blood sugars, hence why there wouldn't be a large insulin spike. Protein does cause some insulin to be secreted, mostly due to the L-leucine and L-glutamine content, but if you are drinking a protein shake that has no sugar/maltodextrin/dextrose added, then the insulin secretion is no more than eating a chicken breast would be, or fairly similar.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Why drink protein shake "after" working out...and not before. I've been doing so before...seems to help the workout. Using whey isolate (Primal Fuel).
    Drinking it after (and adding in something to spike your insulin - which Primal Fuel doesn't have) utilizes insulin to shuttle the amino acids to the muscles to repair them. If you are a bigger (read "need to lose fat") dude - I would add L-leucine and glutamine instead of some sort of sugar to the drink to help get the insulin going, but not have all the sugar that would be converted to palmitic acid if you overdo it. If you want to replace muscle glycogen, then you will *need* carbohydrates to do it. I add dextrose to my PWO whey when I want to do this - usually in a 2:1 ratio of carbs to protein.
    Last edited by IcarianVX; 09-26-2011 at 06:43 PM.
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    Some good info, thanks guys. I use this natural whey protein, but it isn't a pure isolate. I have a hard time finding a pure isolate that isn't ridiculously expensive (i.e. Mark's primal fuel is pretty expensive in my opinion).

    http://www.amazon.com/Optimum-Nutrit...7093221&sr=8-1

    Is this stuff good enough you think? It's weird because some mornings I will throw a little fruit and a serving of whey (approx. 25g) and some flax seed, and don't feel satisfied for too long (I get hungry around 10-11am and want an early lunch. I don't know if it is because it is liquid or if because I'm not getting any fat in my morning shake.

    I now vary my mornings with eggs, bacon, and/or some sausage. I love eggs, but for some reason I'm still stuck in my old ways (20 eggs a week just sounds like a lot!)

    I'll definitly have to up my fat and protein intake as I probably don't get any more than 30g protein max in the morning. Just trying to find an easy way to up my protein (quick and easy as I don't have a lot of time in the morning). I'll probably stick with eggs, and continue to get the nasty stares from family and friends who think it is crazy to be eating all those eggs.

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