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Thread: My disabled kitty, Chairman Mao-cat page

  1. #1
    Nion's Avatar
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    My disabled kitty, Chairman Mao-cat

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    So, I may have mentioned before but I have a disabled cat. He has Cerebellar Hypoplasia

    I'm basically trying to spread the word about his rare disorder, as a lot of cats like him are needlessly put down/abandoned because people don't know any better.
    Also, he's flippin' adorable. He's just very clumsy and walks silly.
    anyway, take a look, spread it around if you like

    TheChairmanMaoCat's Channel - YouTube
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    iniQuity's Avatar
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    NUKEITFROMOUTERSPACE.

    jk, one of my friend's cat has something similar, but it's a little more mobile than your cat seems to be and has a tendency to leap as if frightened, which always scares me but doesn't even phase my friend anymore. Good luck getting the word out!

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    Nion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iniQuity View Post
    NUKEITFROMOUTERSPACE.

    jk, one of my friend's cat has something similar, but it's a little more mobile than your cat seems to be and has a tendency to leap as if frightened, which always scares me but doesn't even phase my friend anymore. Good luck getting the word out!
    Yeah, Chairman's is sort of moderate. I've seen cats better and worse than him, thankfully he uses the box ok, which is all i care about LOL. They do have an exaggerated response to pain and stimulus though.
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    Nion's Avatar
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    More of my lil dude



    I'm a paleo foodie, come check out my recipes: http://strangekitty.ca/

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    I have a disabled cat, too, but nothing quite so dramatic as Mao. Pangur showed up as a gimpy stray, and I couldn't ignore that. So I lured her inside with tuna and captured her. She's overweight now, but loving the housecat life. She had some kind of injury to the ulnar nerve in her left paw. Here's two photos:



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    Cerebellar Hypoplasia in humans is sometimes caused by wheat consumption IIRC. (people with celiac seem more susceptable). A lot of pet foods contain wheat, bran and other assorted grains. I am not sure if eliminaiton of wheat helps humans or not. You could try a raw food diet to see if it helps.

  7. #7
    dado's Avatar
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    Take no offense to this question: why would anyone keep a disabled pet? Surely an able bodied pet is more fun, less hassle, and there are millions of healthy homeless cats out there, if not billions.

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    Dado, why would anyone keep a disabled child? Surely an able bodied child is more fun, less hassle, and there are millions of healthy homeless kids out there, if not billions. (In red china.)

    Yes, I generally equate kids and animals. Although generally cats are cleaner and more fun. It's a life though, a creature that we've basically created as a companion, selecting for traits that are generally appealing be it outward appearance or demeanor. Be it a mobility problem, or a missing leg, or blindness, or deafness those don't depreciation the animal's value and potential positive impacts it will have on your life. Besides, you aren't using a cat to hunt with, it only needs to sleep less than 22 hours a day.

    Had I the room for a gimp cat, I'd welcome one in. Until then, I donate funds.
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    Nion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MudLily View Post
    I have a disabled cat, too, but nothing quite so dramatic as Mao. Pangur showed up as a gimpy stray, and I couldn't ignore that. So I lured her inside with tuna and captured her. She's overweight now, but loving the housecat life. She had some kind of injury to the ulnar nerve in her left paw. Here's two photos:


    Good on you for taking her in. She's gorgeous

    Quote Originally Posted by twa2w View Post
    Cerebellar Hypoplasia in humans is sometimes caused by wheat consumption IIRC. (people with celiac seem more susceptable). A lot of pet foods contain wheat, bran and other assorted grains. I am not sure if eliminaiton of wheat helps humans or not. You could try a raw food diet to see if it helps.
    Feline Parvo is the usual cause along with a few other viral/bacterial infections. It causes brain damage in utero. It's irreversible, though. We do feed him a very good diet that's near to raw as we can get (he can't chew so well, raw meat is not really an option).

    Quote Originally Posted by dado View Post
    Take no offense to this question: why would anyone keep a disabled pet? Surely an able bodied pet is more fun, less hassle, and there are millions of healthy homeless cats out there, if not billions.
    Because i can. Why help anyone? Because i care enough to know that everyone needs help sometimes. 'Hassle' wasn't even a factor here. He needed help, so I obliged.

    Quote Originally Posted by davem View Post
    Dado, why would anyone keep a disabled child? Surely an able bodied child is more fun, less hassle, and there are millions of healthy homeless kids out there, if not billions. (In red china.)

    Yes, I generally equate kids and animals. Although generally cats are cleaner and more fun. It's a life though, a creature that we've basically created as a companion, selecting for traits that are generally appealing be it outward appearance or demeanor. Be it a mobility problem, or a missing leg, or blindness, or deafness those don't depreciation the animal's value and potential positive impacts it will have on your life. Besides, you aren't using a cat to hunt with, it only needs to sleep less than 22 hours a day.

    Had I the room for a gimp cat, I'd welcome one in. Until then, I donate funds.

    Exactly. Thanks for understanding. He's pretty much our kid, haha
    I'm a paleo foodie, come check out my recipes: http://strangekitty.ca/

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dado View Post
    Take no offense to this question: why would anyone keep a disabled pet? Surely an able bodied pet is more fun, less hassle, and there are millions of healthy homeless cats out there, if not billions.
    To an animal lover, your question is offensive. What are you supposed to do with them? Just kill them? Would YOU be willing to kill all the disabled animals?

    I adopted a 2 year old greyhound that became totally blind by the age of 6. Yeah, we have to make some adjustments for her and she really sucks at fetch, but she's worth it. And she deserves to live just as much as our sighted hounds. I've actually learned a lot from her. I also make adjustments for our hounds as they age. I don't kill them or trade them in for "funner" model. Too many people do.

    Hopefully you never become disabled and get tossed aside when you are no longer convenient or fun for people to have to deal with.

    I *can* understand shelters with limited resources putting down less adoptable cats and dogs...often those are animals who are the wrong color, the wrong age, the wrong breed or have a disability. No shelter likes to make those decisions, but they have to be made sometimes b/c it's the fickle public that are looking for "perfect" animals and resources are limited.
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