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Thread: Best Micro Livestock? page

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    DarthFriendly's Avatar
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    Best Micro Livestock?

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    Okay, so I was pondering what kind of backyard Livestock would be best from a Primal Nutrition point of view. I'm talking about Urban Homesteaders without much space, like not enough room for goats, and such.

    You can "legally" raise chickens in NYC supposedly, although good luck getting the by the co-op board in Manhattan. Chickens are pretty cool, you get eggs which are awesome and the meat eventually depending on how you go about it. I personally don't do great on chicken for a majority of my meals, but they're definitely a strong contender.

    How does other poultry stack up? Pigeons? (raised not wild....haha.) Could you even raise ducks in an urban environment?

    Rabbits would seem like a good choice, but they're very lean. You need a lot more dietary fat than rabbits can give you as a staple. Maybe a good supplemental protein choice, and probably doable easily in urban settings.

    Guinea pigs? Someone I know just got back from Peru, she wouldn't eat the guinea pigs but you can raise 'em easy enough. How do they stack up nutritionally?

    What's the nutrition on other house pets? Cats, dogs? If Grok were hungry, he'd eat 'em. Rats? We knew that Grok ate long pig.

    Frogs, and turtles look pretty lean, but what do I know about the nutritional content of amphibians? How hard could it be to raise frogs?

    Just a random thought...

    If I had a few acres I might try my hand at a variety of these protein sources just to cover some bases, but if you had to go with one food animal in a limited space, which is the biggest bang for your nutritional buck?

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    Chickens would absolutely be the easiest in a urban setting.

    I have dairy goats, which aren't *technically* primal. We drink raw milk, make yogurt, and make cheeses.

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    DarthFriendly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnabair View Post
    Chickens would absolutely be the easiest in a urban setting.

    I have dairy goats, which aren't *technically* primal. We drink raw milk, make yogurt, and make cheeses.
    I think the goats are fine. My brother raises goats for meat in the suburbs of the midwest.

    I forgot aquaculture.... Growing fish in vats. Farm raised fish...EEEEEVIIIIIILLLLL! Spooooooooooky!!!! But still it's an option, I know you can do shrimp, and tilapia this way. Feed 'em flax meal? What? I dunno. As part of an integrated system it might work, I think there's a brewery in Chicago that does this or something.

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    Alex Good's Avatar
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    Let some boars loose in the local woods and hunt them with a spear.
    In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

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    I couldn't do guinea pigs. No way. I spend waaaay too much time cutting those critters up for my cats.

    They have only a little bit of fat on them- they stink to high heaven, half their weight is POO. Seriously, open one up and from the diaphragm all the way to the hole it's POO. Cut all that out and you have a titchy little bit of stinky meat for all your effort.

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    I would definitely go with chickens. Australorps. They're supposed to be the quietest, and they aren't flighty.

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    Chickens would be my choice. There are also some really cute mini-goats out there, but I'm afraid I couldn't eat them after becoming their friend.

    Puppy is a delicacy in many parts of the world. I wouldn't recommend dog unless you are willing to put up with the wrath of your neighborhood. And cat? I think I'd go for rat first.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarthFriendly View Post
    Frogs, and turtles look pretty lean, but what do I know about the nutritional content of amphibians? How hard could it be to raise frogs?
    Frogs are actually very difficult to raise in any large quantity. I'm considering not eating them anymore due to the fact that the wild populations are dwindling and no one's really figured out how to farm them effectively. I used to have pet frogs, which is easy enough, but on a mass scale it can be really hard, as they mainly eat anything they can fit into their mouths, including each other. The young of some species even cannibalize their siblings. Perhaps if you mass produced crickets, but that's not a very balanced diet. You'd also have to raise mice for the pinkies, meal worms, earth worms, minnows, etc . . . .

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    Chickens would be my first choice, a good multipurpose breed like a barred rock. Roosters go in the stew pot, hens lay eggs and stew pot when they are done laying. Second choice would be rabbit. Tasty, reasonable meat, easy to keep and secondary market for rabbit pelts. You'd be better getting off a hair sheep rather than a goat if you had that much room, something like a Dorper that is compact, has plenty of meat, and doesn't need shearing.
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    mealworms? crickets?

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