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Thread: Politics of Food in China page

  1. #1
    rayout's Avatar
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    Politics of Food in China

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    In China, what you eat tells who you are - latimes.com

    In China, the organic food is reserved for the rich and not even available for sale to the general public. I am actually afraid to visit that country due to concerns about eating while I'm there...

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    Laconophile's Avatar
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    The scary thing is that China is being lauded as a 'successful model' worthy of emulation by globalist elites. If China is the model of success in the 'global economy', count me out, I'd rather have a self-sufficient economy like we used to in the US.
    Ye shall know them by their fruits.

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    "Globalist elites." Oh, c'mon. The US has never had a self-sufficient economy. Read up on your history, friend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CoS View Post
    "Globalist elites." Oh, c'mon. The US has never had a self-sufficient economy. Read up on your history, friend.
    CoS, you've peaked my interest. I tend to think that the U.S. *did* have a period where it was overwhelmingly (if not totally) self-sufficient. During WWII the U.S. provided much or most of the Allies with their oil as well and food and war materials. I'm not sure what the U.S. *had* to import around that time. After WWII the U.S. was really the ONLY manufacturer left standing *and* enjoyed fertile farmlands and huge natural resource reserves.

    Don't get me wrong... I'm not sure we could or should realistically try to return to self-sufficiency -- an interconnected world has its advantages -- I'm just curious about what you're referring to.
    Life is short: Void the warranty.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CoS View Post
    "Globalist elites." Oh, c'mon.
    I'm sorry, our benevolent billionaire bigwigs. Is that better?

    The US has never had a self-sufficient economy. Read up on your history, friend.
    You see, we used to have these things in the US called 'factories'. I know, it's a strange word. Thankfully we've since been enlightened by our billionaire friends and we no longer need such barbarous relics. Our service economy is doing just fine with full employment! No worries at all.
    Ye shall know them by their fruits.

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    Get used to rice, rice, noodles, rice, and of course, rice....unless it's really plastic bags masquerading as rice.

    I jest.

    I have been reading this book, When China Rules The World. It is dry, long, and slightly scary. Despite its misgivings, it is a good primer on the history behind the politics of China. As with all civilizations, food and politics go hand in hand. You'd be surprised by how dependent China is on the rest of the world for their food. China is globalized, just like the rest of us. They actually have very little fertile land there, their water supply is heavily polluted (in some places the water is undrinkable), and the soil is pretty much shot in most parts of China.

    You'd also be surprised as to exactly how great the class and race divides are in China. It's not just the food that separates the haves from the have nots in China.

    Organic food? I wouldn't trust it in China. C'mon, this is the same country that had the melamine in the infant formula and all of these other issues. China is not known for its food safety. I doubt their organic standards are anywhere near those in the US (not that ours are an excellent measure but at least there are some sort of standards here).

    Ack.

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    If you mean self-sufficient in the sense that we didn't have to ever trade for anything, and could provide for ourselves entirely...then you're wrong.

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    Even people from China don't trust their own food.

    I'm from Hong Kong (right across the border), and hordes of mainland chinese people come to HK and buy baby formula like no other. Formula shortage happens quite a lot in HK, lol.

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    I spent all of last year in China, loads of people were scared about a big steamed bread (mantou) scandal, (using chemicals to make them seem fresh), of course, the milk (particularly baby-formula) is not the safest in the world and that whole issue in 2008 was pretty damned horrific, but since it became publicised, I can't imagine it being repeated.

    Usually, I feel safe trusting my taste buds as to the quality of food.

    I was initially concerned about MSG, but later I decided it's probably not as dangerous as some people make it out to be.

    There's also something I really don't understand called 'shouroujing'(lean-meat-untranslatable), which apparently increases the amount of lean meat produced by livestock. Lots of people are scared of that.

    The nasty stuff is the cooking oil though, especially in cheap restaurants, it's often re-used and animal fats are disappearing in developed areas, so it's all going to be soybean or peanut oil.

    I coped, even thrived while I was there (except for some inevitable diarrhoea). But, being primalists, I assume most people on this forum will be very sensitive about all the crap you will inevitably end up eating in Chinese restaurants. If you're spending a long time there, I recommend that you cook for yourself (wash all vegetables), learn to say 'no MSG', 'not so much salt', 'no sugar' that kind of thing.

    To be honest, I found myself feeling fairly healthy in China, I think their general attitude to food is still generally pretty good (but getting a lot worse). So, yeah, good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChaiKe View Post
    I spent all of last year in China, loads of people were scared about a big steamed bread (mantou) scandal, (using chemicals to make them seem fresh), of course, the milk (particularly baby-formula) is not the safest in the world and that whole issue in 2008 was pretty damned horrific, but since it became publicised, I can't imagine it being repeated.

    Usually, I feel safe trusting my taste buds as to the quality of food.

    I was initially concerned about MSG, but later I decided it's probably not as dangerous as some people make it out to be.

    There's also something I really don't understand called 'shouroujing'(lean-meat-untranslatable), which apparently increases the amount of lean meat produced by livestock. Lots of people are scared of that.

    The nasty stuff is the cooking oil though, especially in cheap restaurants, it's often re-used and animal fats are disappearing in developed areas, so it's all going to be soybean or peanut oil.

    I coped, even thrived while I was there (except for some inevitable diarrhoea). But, being primalists, I assume most people on this forum will be very sensitive about all the crap you will inevitably end up eating in Chinese restaurants. If you're spending a long time there, I recommend that you cook for yourself (wash all vegetables), learn to say 'no MSG', 'not so much salt', 'no sugar' that kind of thing.

    To be honest, I found myself feeling fairly healthy in China, I think their general attitude to food is still generally pretty good (but getting a lot worse). So, yeah, good luck.
    This? Who else uses shu ru j

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