Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: The Asian Dilemma page

  1. #1
    rjtung's Avatar
    rjtung Guest

    1

    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    Mark,


    First of all, let me say that I thoroughly enjoyed reading your book as well as your daily blog. I am 100% on board with eating primal and have made changes in my life to eat more like our ancestors did. However, one question still eludes me. I have not been able to find the answer in your book or daily blog either. Being of Asian descent, you are probably well aware that a staple of our diet is exactly the type of carbs that you argue against consuming (i.e. white rice, noodles, etc.) Ask any Asian person to give these things up and they will probably look at you like you're crazy. Coming from a mindset where I used to eat a bite of white rice with every bite of food, this habit has not been easy for me to change. However, if you look at Asian cultures in general, they have been known to be among the healthiest; Okinawans come to my mind first and foremost. Can you please elaborate on why you believe this is and how a culture with carbs as one of its staple foods can remain so healthy? Thanks.


  2. #2
    Godzilla's Avatar
    Godzilla is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tokyo
    Posts
    210

    1



    I'm Asian American. I live in Tokyo. I have stopped eating rice and noodles and have experienced fat loss, a drop of 17 pounds from 207 to 190, in the past five months. It could be that I don't consume wheat and sugar also. But the primal nutritional plan has worked for me when exercise alone wouldn't do it. It is difficult to give up rice, no doubt, but I feel a lot healthier than before. I'm 51.


  3. #3
    FlyNavyWife's Avatar
    FlyNavyWife is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Hanford, CA
    Posts
    330

    1



    I went to China for a month a few years ago (to a small town in the southeast)... and the food in the town where I was was so healthy! Most meals centered around lots of meat, fish, and vegetables. Rice was served but the local people only ate a small bowl - mostly to soak up the sauce the meat and vegetables had on them. It was much more of a side dish/condiment than a staple, for sure.


    Just wanted to throw that out there... not all Asian people are chowing down on noodles and rice constantly. Certainly not in the town I was in!

    Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

  4. #4
    Mr.M's Avatar
    Mr.M is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    115

    1



    I'll give a little bit of sympathy towards the OP; I live in Hawaii and rice/noodles are so common its extremely rough on anyone trying to go primal.


    I love "Pho", or Vietnamese noodle soup...imagine the look on my friends & the waiters face when I 1) eat 0 of the noodles or 2) request for noodles. People are flabbergasted! Not to mention every bargain lunch plate comes with heaping amounts of rice.


    Don't get me wrong; I don't eat any grains anymore. But, I understand the pressures for the OP.


    My advice is to take it gradually, remove 1 thing first (rice) completely, then try take out noodles next. You'll find the effect on your body/mind pretty addicting, to be honest.


    As for the social pressures - you'll find the visual evidence of your body will speak for itself.


  5. #5
    Mr.M's Avatar
    Mr.M is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    115

    1



    OH - and to answer the OP's question...


    Not every person is created equal. Foods affect people in different manners. More precisely, that big bowl of rice you see some asian people chow down doesn't spike their insulin & blood glucose levels sky high. Call it genetic luck, I suppose. Keep in mind - not every asian person has the same genes. I see fat asians around Hawaii ALL the time. I also see skinny ones.


    Side thought, maybe its truly the affect of the SAD (standard american diet) as opposed to more traditional asian diets; which are getting harder and harder to come by nowadays (costs me ~$6-10 to buy root vegetables, nishime, at a japanese market.....).


    In any case, my personal belief is that some people just aren't AS affected by rice/grain consumption...still doesn't make consuming rice/grains ideal.


    Or an analogy - just because I CAN drink 10 shots of whiskey before I fall over and pass out doesn't mean I drink 5 a day. Or 1 a day, for that matter.


  6. #6
    madMUHHH's Avatar
    madMUHHH Guest

    1



    I personally think there are three factors playing in there:


    1: Rice does spike blood glucose, there is no doubt about that, but as long the source of carbs is not too refined the following insulin response will not be our of proportion. This means that even though their insulin gets up, they don't develop insulin resistance and thus they do not get disease like diabetes etc. I also do not think that the genetic factor plays a big role, it may play a role, but I don't think it's the main thing to look for.


    2. The traditional Asian diet doesn't contain artificial sugar, HFCS, additives, preservatives etc. or at least not to an extend like the SAD does. In my opinion those things are the main course for all diseases of civilization, not necessarily carbs by themselves (the Kitavan's and other primitive "high-carb" cultures prove this quite well).


    3. Apart from the rice, whic certainly isn't all that nutritious, the Asian diet consists of a lot of good stuff. Fermented veggies, fish, sea vegetables, meat etc.


  7. #7
    Shazkar's Avatar
    Shazkar is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    12

    1



    i think a large part of their health is due to a relative lack of sugar in their diets, at least as far as i've read


    i'm also struggling with dealing with my family (south asian, not vegetarians but anti-lots of meat consumption, mostly due to what the standard diet from western india is like)


    it's certainly a challenge, but good luck


  8. #8
    danmerk23's Avatar
    danmerk23 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    16

    1



    I spent some time in China and Taiwain, and my experience was that the locals ate mostly veggies and meats and rices and noodles were simple "on the side." A generalization for sure, but I think the stereotype that all Asians are healthy and thin is also a generalization. I had a discussion with a friend from India. He has terrible cholesterol and keeps telling me he eats a "perfect diet." His diet was mostly legumes (dahls) and rice. He was vegetarian (Hindu) and ate only chicken when he ate out. His take on it was that he had to give up ghee. I keep telling him to give up the grains and focus on veggies, nuts, and fruits.


    Just like Keys study, it's a complete generalization.


  9. #9
    chocolatechip69's Avatar
    chocolatechip69 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    6

    1



    To give up ghee? Oh, no. That's the tastiest part of his diet...and the best one too.


  10. #10
    primalclubber's Avatar
    primalclubber is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    286

    1



    I agree with Daniel. I other thing I noticed in Hong Kong and Taiwan was that the poportions of noodles/rice dishes were much smaller, say about half the size of a typical bowl of noodles here in the US. Also when I was in Italy, I noticed that pasta is mainly a side dish, not a main dish as it is here in the US. I have to believe the introduction of "western" foods such as breads and pastries and sodas have contributed more to a higher carb diet in Asia that simply eating rice.


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •