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Thread: Comments regarding 2x4 strength training routine page

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    pacificBeef's Avatar
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    Question Comments regarding 2x4 strength training routine

    Primal Fuel
    A friend of mine showed me his strength training program that I'd like people here to comment on.
    Basically, 3 lifts using 2 sets of 4 reps only.

    Schedule:
    Lift 3 days a week on non-consecutive days

    Lifts:
    Do only 3 main lifts every workout : Dead lift, Squat, Bench Press
    Start each workout with a different main lift
    Do only 2 sets of 4 reps
    Do no more than 2 supporting exercises if desired but not necessary
    Use absolutely perfect form
    Never lift to failure

    Weights:
    Starting weight should be 65% of your 1 rep max
    For the first 4 workouts, increase from starting weight by as much as 10lbs each workout depending on comfort
    After that, each increase in weight should be at the smallest increment possible (for instance, the 24 hour fitness I go to only has 2.5lb plates so I could only go up by 5 lbs)

    Details:
    If you cannot complete a workout using perfect form, roll back to a weight from 2 workouts ago and go from there
    If you are rolling back too often, you might be working out too much or eating too little
    Never lift to failure. Lifts should have perfect form and you should have a lot left in the tank.
    After 6 months, stop and do absolutely no lifting.
    When you start up again, add 10lbs-20lbs to your starting weight.

    Has anyone experienced or seen anything similar?

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    bcbcbc2's Avatar
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    Sure, its similar to all the heavy single progression stuff: SS,SL,NR Hard Gainer.
    Lower volume but squats AND deads every session.

    I HATE counting deads as an upper body pull, I'd definitely add chins as the allowed extra.

    It's hard to see NEVER failing on single progression.

    Buy and carry your own 1.25's or improvise for microloading. Even extra collars might work.

    With 4's I hope considerable warmup is encouraged.
    Last edited by bcbcbc2; 09-07-2011 at 09:41 PM.

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    Knockoff of Power to the People (Pavel T's program). His is 2x5, but you only deadlift and press, and are supposed to do it five days a week.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bcbcbc2 View Post
    Sure, its similar to all the heavy single progression stuff: SS,SL,NR Hard Gainer.
    Lower volume but squats AND deads every session.
    Interesting I'll have to look those up.

    Quote Originally Posted by bcbcbc2 View Post
    I HATE counting deads as an upper body pull, I'd definitely add chins as the allowed extra.
    He suggested as much. Chins and pulls.

    Quote Originally Posted by bcbcbc2 View Post
    It's hard to see NEVER failing on single progression.
    I'm new to strength training in general, could you explain what you mean?


    Quote Originally Posted by bcbcbc2 View Post
    With 4's I hope considerable warmup is encouraged.
    He said I should do bodyweight versions of the movements as warmup. Air squats, push ups and I suppose chins could count as both support and warmup? Do you think this is enough?

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    pacificBeef's Avatar
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    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by RezH View Post
    Knockoff of Power to the People (Pavel T's program). His is 2x5, but you only deadlift and press, and are supposed to do it five days a week.
    Ah makes sense now. My friend is a former soviet olympic weight lifter and he told me this was the routine he used for competition (I also recall him mentioning periodization and other things I had to google but are probably too advance for me at the moment).

    He doesn't go into detail which is why I brought it up here so I have a few questions

    Why never to failure?

    Why low volume?

    Could someone expand on "microloading"?

  6. #6
    Abu Reena's Avatar
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    @pacific beef: Buy Starting Strength. Follow that. If this guy is a former soviet o-lifter, and you are new to the game, you need a solid foundation. Starting Strength will do that. Plus, Rippetoe has a forum where he'll answer questions about it.

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    AndreaReina's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacificBeef View Post
    He said I should do bodyweight versions of the movements as warmup. Air squats, push ups and I suppose chins could count as both support and warmup? Do you think this is enough?
    Bodyweight versions of the movement might prepare the tissues, but won't do much on the neural side -- preparing your brain to push in this specific pattern. Like Abu Reena said, buy Starting Strength for coverage of the basics that is among the best, if not the best.

    You want to avoid going to failure because it is very stressful on your CNS (central nervous system) and provides little additional benefit but increases recovery greatly (think a week). Strength training is mostly low volume because volume and intensity are inversely proportional -- as one goes up the other goes down. Since intensity is needed for strength gains, volume must therefore be low. Microloading just means adding very little weight to the bar, less than the 5lb jump that is available at most gyms. This is done because as you progress in the lifts you won't be able to add 5lbs every session, but you will be able to keep adding weight as long as the increase is small. Basically it's a way to continue uninterrupted progress, even if the progress is slow. A 1-pound increase every session is 3 pounds a week, which is 156 pounds a year -- hardly anything to sneeze at.

  8. #8
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    squats and deads are both great exercises but the prime mover muscles are the same in different proportions
    that makes programming tricky

    SS has 30 reps of squats and 5 reps of deads each 2 training days
    2by4 has 16 reps of squats and 16 reps of deads each 2 training days

    similar volume across the 2 similar exercises. interesting

    look at ss, stronglifts ,new rules of lifting and hardganer/stuart mcroberts

  9. #9
    pacificBeef's Avatar
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    just bought SS. thanks for the replies
    Last edited by pacificBeef; 09-09-2011 at 10:55 AM.

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    Now buy the companion video...you won't regret it.

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