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    Primal Babe's Avatar
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    Question Are smoked meats ok if I'm trying to heal a "leaky gut" from Celiacs?

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    I eat smoked meats probably 8x a month. A pkg of bacon will last me for 3-4 breakfasts... I'll have smoked pork steaks a couple times a month. Should I be avoiding these foods if I want to heal a leaky gut brought on from Celiacs?

    Anyone know?

    Thanks...

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    Depends on the added ingredients. The smoking itself adds nothing to the meat other than the smoke flavor. However, commercially smoked meats are usually seasoned or marinated before smoking and those are the ingredients you have to look at. Soy for example is a common ingredient in commercial marinades. The meats, the bacon and pork particularly, may also cured which requires additional ingredients.

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    Thank-you for your reply... the bacon I buy is from a local farmer & contains no "extra crap".. No soy, no corn crap, no seasonings, etc.. It's dry cured & does contain nitrates. Still ok?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Primal Babe View Post
    Thank-you for your reply... the bacon I buy is from a local farmer & contains no "extra crap".. No soy, no corn crap, no seasonings, etc.. It's dry cured & does contain nitrates. Still ok?
    You'd get more nitrate from some vegetables than you would from bacon, so I doubt that's a worry.

    As for the title you used for the thread ....

    Well, the GAPS book, which you probably already know of—

    Amazon.com: Gut and Psychology Syndrome: Natural Treatment for Autism, Dyspraxia, A.D.D., Dyslexia, A.D.H.D., Depression, Schizophrenia (9780954852023): Natasha Campbell-McBride: Books

    —warns people with gut problems to avoid smoked meat and fish. I don't know why. Possibly some of the compounds found in smoke (which would obviously find their way into the outer layer of smoked food) could irritate a tender gut. Considering they can inhibit bacteria and ward off insect pests—which were, of course, the original reasons for smoking as a preservation method—those compounds may be problematic not only to bacteria and insects. AFAIK, in the old days when hams were hung in the chimney and really smoked pretty heavily, they cut the outer layer off and threw it away when they came to eat the ham. But I don't know for sure. I don't think she says why in the book—perhaps it's just a practical finding that some patients who have eaten those foods have complained of stomach pains.

    Play it by ear perhaps. Try a little and see if you're OK.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Primal Babe View Post
    Thank-you for your reply... the bacon I buy is from a local farmer & contains no "extra crap".. No soy, no corn crap, no seasonings, etc.. It's dry cured & does contain nitrates. Still ok?
    I don't know whether OK or not. I use either fresh bacon, which is just unprocessed butchered pork belly, or "uncured" bacon which is cured with celery salt or celery powder rather than nitrates.

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    Unfortunately, the celery-based cures work because celery has nitrates in them. The difference is that unlike conventionally cured bacon, there is no (FDA?) limit on how much of a celery product can be used. This has led to some individuals adding several times the maximum level of nitrates from celery products. I'd worry more about the quality of the source animal.

    Fair warning: my source on this info is a meat curer who I don't buy from - meaning he has no incentive to lie to me.

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    Thanks for the information re:GAPS book... I actually didn't know of it... :/ I'm down to eating just meat, veggies, most fruit, raw honey, tea, & olive oil. (all 100% organic, free run, free range, etc..) I'm literally allergic/intolerant to everything else. But I'm trying to keep my weight stable at the same time as healing myself. I've dropped a few lbs and i'm at 115lbs, 5'9". I can't afford to lose anymore weight.

    As for the uncured bacon, I wonder if I should go that route then... my source for uncured bacon is $10/pkg though...

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    Quote Originally Posted by scotchncoffee View Post
    Unfortunately, the celery-based cures work because celery has nitrates in them. The difference is that unlike conventionally cured bacon, there is no (FDA?) limit on how much of a celery product can be used. This has led to some individuals adding several times the maximum level of nitrates from celery products. I'd worry more about the quality of the source animal.

    Fair warning: my source on this info is a meat curer who I don't buy from - meaning he has no incentive to lie to me.
    I was just going to mention that. Celery salt/juice is sodium nitrite. That's why it works as a replacement preservative. Look at a package of Oscar Mayer "No Nitrates and Nitrites Added!" hot dogs and you'll see the very fine print which reads "except those naturally occurring in celery juice ". It's the same stuff, just in a different form.

    Honestly, you'd be hard pressed to find anyone that will say it's actually good for you. For those of us sensitive to sodium nitrite, it means avoiding foods that aren't so great for you anyway, since it's a vasodilator and can cause migraines, among other things. But it's really tough saying No to bacon, hot dogs, pepperoni and most beef jerky, in addition to many deli meats (even most deli turkey has it).

    I doubt it will do anyone a huge amount of harm, taken in small doses. But it will cause problems in any amount if you're sensitive to it. And I definitely wouldn't consider it the healthiest choice.
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    you could always just get pork belly instead of bacon and you would have the same meat without any spices or curing. Bacon doesn't bother me, but I don't tend to eat in much anyways. I think you just have to listen to your body to see if it works or not. I understand the whole thing about not having many choices, so you want to keep as many options open as you can.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scotchncoffee View Post
    Unfortunately, the celery-based cures work because celery has nitrates in them. The difference is that unlike conventionally cured bacon, there is no (FDA?) limit on how much of a celery product can be used. This has led to some individuals adding several times the maximum level of nitrates from celery products. I'd worry more about the quality of the source animal.

    Fair warning: my source on this info is a meat curer who I don't buy from - meaning he has no incentive to lie to me.
    Good to know. I will work on getting more of the fresh bacon which tastes better anyway.

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