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  1. #3371
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    Fartski, I'm just blathering, people. End of fiscal year crunch and precious little time to goof, so when a little time bubbles up, what do I do? I become the guest who wouldn't leave on someone else's journal.

  2. #3372
    cori93437's Avatar
    cori93437 is offline Senior Member
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    FW... I love you.
    You cogitate.
    Blather on dear sir!
    Bach wrote cello suites... nuff said. All the love!
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.


  3. #3373
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    naiadknight is online now Senior Member
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    I've loved MOST lit books I've read. On the other hand, there is one lit book my HS english teacher made us read that I would gladly throw into the fire: Cry the Beloved Country. I. HATE. THAT. BOOK. Blablahblahblah, apartheid blows, wah... She could've picked any other book on apartheid in South Africa and I might have enjoyed it. That one sucked from the ass of Stephanie Meyer and spit out the result.
    I was the kid that read the unadulterated (no footnotes) Shakespeare and LOVED it, begged for more. Then again, as a kid, we were told Shakespeare must've used a woman like my grandmother as a reference for The Taming of the Shrew and "if you think I'm evil, go read Hamlet and get back to me." We were told that Romeo and Juliet isn't love, it's lust, go read Robert Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land for love.
    We grew up immersed in literature. When I first discovered Animal Farm in 4th grade, it was a pretty story. Reread it in 8th grade, I got some of the darker meaning. Reread it in 10th grade and I LOVED it. I can still go passage for passage with the Oresteia, Illiad, and Odyssey. I was the kid in UIL Poetry that chose Ambrose Bierce and Matthew Arnold while reading Stephen King for UIL Prose. When everyone else was reading Goosebumps, I was getting goosebumps from 1984 and Brave New World.
    Stephenie Meyer's phase will die out as the trash it is soon enough, as will so many others in pop lit. The glorious ones of our era will survive, precious few that there are, and people will know us by our authors.
    "No fate but what we make"- Sarah Connor, Terminator 2
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
    My Primal Battle Tome

  4. #3374
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    Quote Originally Posted by cori93437 View Post
    FW... I love you.
    You cogitate.
    Blather on dear sir!
    Bach wrote cello suites... nuff said. All the love!
    I adore the Unaccompanied Cello Suites. In my raucous punk days I would listen to them over and over. And sometimes I would patch a cord into my stereo's headphone jack and run it into a guitar amp* and listen to it distorted and max volume. But usually just the regular way. The English and French Suites, the Goldbergs, the Cello Suites, the cantatas and Passion music... It's in my blood.


    *This was also an effective mode of expressing displeasure when my then-neighbor at Fred's Luxury Estates** would roll in at 3:00 fucking a in the m and begin playing country music at sufficient decibels to let folks for several counties know that a hoedown was underway. I, who value sleep above most other mortal wants, was always amused and patient with this proclivity, for the nanosecond before my eye would twitch open and lava began coursing through my veins. Here, my rebuttal usually lay with one of two (or both of the following) modes of editorializing: 1) I would drop 20# barbells from shoulder height onto the floor several times, or 2) using the stereo out-to-amp in method, I would flip the amp downward onto the floor and play Motorhead, which, sufficiently distorted, was an unintelligible roar of madness.

    This neighbor may have been the cleverly nicknamed Chief, so called because of supposed American Indian heritage, but it may have been someone subsequent to Chief, and frankly there are many reasons for me not to remember details of the era roughly comprising the 1980s. I believe at one point I nailed a list of demands (something along the lines QUIT PLAYING YOUR FUCKING COUNTRY MUSIC) to his door, a la Luther, and now that I reminisce there were several times smoke bombs were sent hurtling to the bottom of the steps in protest.

    **Not the real name of the apartments, but the name of the real guy was Fred Groff, undoubtedly deceased. Let me skate late on the rent several times, bless 'im. Place was sort of a shithole, really. But Mrs. FW didn't mind, thought it quaint. Course, three months later we were out and shacking, so perhaps she's being kind. This was several years after Chief or Chief's replacement. Whoever the douche with the country music was.

  5. #3375
    canio6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    I play the organ (I've heard all the jokes...), so I am firmly on Team Bach.

    Actually, I love music from all eras, but then, once upon a time, I was a music major.
    Damn, if only you hadn't given up on white, cisgendered males


    I'm more a Handel guy to be honest. Not that Bach is not fantastic but given how prolific he was there is much that doesn't quite do it for me.

    As for Ethan Frome, I actually enjoyed it. Jane Austen, not so much. >.>

    Quote Originally Posted by Finnegans Wake View Post
    Handel is marvelous.

    Bach is godlike. Bach is a drug to me. There was a reason they sent the Brandenburg Concerto into space.
    True, though too many people play it on flutes now instead of recorders like it was intended. Breaks my old recorder playing heart

  6. #3376
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    Shakespeare wrote a lot of strong women, which seems anomalous for his age.

    I remember reading 1984 on summer vacation, either between 7th and 8th or 8th and 9th. Very vivid recollection of the community pool, the disconnect between Oceania and the sparkling pool and the smell of fries and this one girl who was really developing nicely, I think she was the older sister of a classmate. A lot of reads have specific associations: Tolkien, my grandparent's back porch swing and the smell of honeysuckle. Les Miserables, cramped and carsick on some trip to (where?) in, IIRC, the shitty Vega with my stepfather smoking. Later, Beckett, sitting in very hot summer sun, sometimes drunk. Actually, all the "B writers" in the hot as balls Fred's Luxury Apartments, again, often drunk: Beckett, Borges, Ballard, Bowles, Burroughs, Bukowski... it was like I was stuck in the alphabet.

  7. #3377
    Owly's Avatar
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    Hey, I haven't given up on them entirely--there's a perfectly lovely one who sleeps in my bed with me every night! I'm optimistic that he will be the last man I ever sleep with because I've managed to keep him around for life.

    And see, I adore Austen. But you have to get her sense of humour.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

    Owly's Journal

  8. #3378
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    naiadknight is online now Senior Member
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    I grew up on classical music and operas, in addition to rock and jazz. A Handel piece played right is enough to make the blood run cold, a Bach piece played right is enough to metaphorically make a gay man straight, just until the song ends. A Wagner piece, you feel in your bones and know you did something to sadden or piss off the gods. A Beethoven, you're floating on air, either in a thunderstorm or a light summer breeze. Yo-Yo Ma's originals and you're ready to pull a Romeo.
    THere was a song for every occasion in my dad's collection, and I do mean every occasion. Wagner if you're depressed or angry. Handel if you're victorious. Beethoven if you just want to feel something, anything. Bach if you're flitting among the clouds in euphoria.

    And for the music geek in all of us:
    "I'll be Bach."
    "I can Handel that"
    "I was Beethoven you couldn't."
    "We'll Shea what happens."
    "They'll be carting you out in a little red Wagner, Offe!"
    "No fate but what we make"- Sarah Connor, Terminator 2
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
    My Primal Battle Tome

  9. #3379
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    drssgchic is offline Senior Member
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    I'm feeling so . . . under-read right now. But I can lay claim to two copies of Shakespere's Complete Works One for my birthday, one for winning the literature prize in highschool.
    http://cattaillady.com/ My blog exploring the beginning stages of learning how to homestead. With the occasional rant.

    Originally Posted by TheFastCat: Less is more more or less

    And now I have an Etsy store: CattailsandCalendula

  10. #3380
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    Quote Originally Posted by naiadknight View Post
    I grew up on classical music and operas, in addition to rock and jazz. A Handel piece played right is enough to make the blood run cold, a Bach piece played right is enough to metaphorically make a gay man straight, just until the song ends. A Wagner piece, you feel in your bones and know you did something to sadden or piss off the gods. A Beethoven, you're floating on air, either in a thunderstorm or a light summer breeze. Yo-Yo Ma's originals and you're ready to pull a Romeo.
    THere was a song for every occasion in my dad's collection, and I do mean every occasion. Wagner if you're depressed or angry. Handel if you're victorious. Beethoven if you just want to feel something, anything. Bach if you're flitting among the clouds in euphoria.
    Just perfect, thank you.

    Unbearable Lightness of Being + a second phase of immersion in Beethoven's 9th + walking around a lot on the rain faux-philosophizing and thinking myself deep, and full of the Sturm and Drang and all that.

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