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  1. #31
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    Primal Fuel
    Does his school not have a weight room? You mentioned home equipment was limited but didn't say anything about the school. Lifting there would help in not only gaining size and strength but would get him noticed more by the coaches, etc. Also as already mentioned, up the protein. I wish my parents had been more involved in my nutrition at that age. Good job.

  2. #32
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    zoebird is offline Senior Member
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    my three year old "shoots" up -- they are called growth spurts. and no, he's not in puberty. children grow -- that's normal. puberty will have secondary characteristics, not just growth. dad will know them when he sees them.

  3. #33
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    The varsity team running back in my high school was 5'6" and maybe 140 lbs. He won state for us by virtue of the fact he was so fast nobody could catch him. He also broke state records in track for sprints. At thirteen, I'm afraid time is really going to be the only answer. My first husband was 5'5 until he was 18 when he grew 6+ inches in about 4 months and topped 220lbs. He gets asked what position he played in football in school and he answers that he was too small, he played french horn. That raises a few eyebrows. I wouldn't recommend heavy weightlifting that young, too easy to damage growing joints. Feed him well and keep him moving.
    I have two teenaged daughters who are now almost 19 and almost 20. They are very frustrated by the fact that they never grew(short family) and they are 5' 3 1/2" and 5' 3 3/4". They are mad that they are not taller than me( 5' 5").

    Ingvildr

  4. #34
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    lifting weights does not damage growing joints unless some sort of catastrophic injury occurs.
    use your google for plenty of information abound on this.
    .. also plenty of people spreading information to the contrary.


    kids incur very high loading forces in normal every day play. far more than what they can handle with a barbell on their back. good form and proper loading can yield great know how for future training. OVER USE of the same movement CAN be detrimental to joints (kids lifting in front of the mirror doing rediculous amounts of loading to get their biceps to grow) but this can occur outside the weight room as well, with every day tasks or hobbies (twisting your body into certain positions to play a muscial instrument for example).

    simply lifting some heavy weights sometimes and lifting weights in general is not going to damage kids.
    to the contrary, it can help protect them during high impact sports like football. many of the demands put on athletes on the field can be lessened if they put in the correct amount of prepatory work off the field. weightlifting can be a part of this plan. you cant walk on to a field of play and expect to have all the qualities you will need in that sport sufficiently developed. extra strengthening work for ankles, knees, hips, spine, neck, shoulders etc WILL help with almost all sports.

    .. kids give each other piggy back rides and jump off of objects nearly as tall as their heads, they run around and fight and wrestle and tumble and do all sorts of crazy stuff. putting a weight (even a moderately heavy one) in some kids hands or across their back, in a controlled, safe, non-chaotic environment, and teaching them how to move under these demanding loads is not dangerous, its smart training.

  5. #35
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    Just my .02...but I really think that much milk for a kid could contribute to pro-acne conditions if it's conventional milk. You may get the kiddo on the team, but a whole host of other self-esteem issues could result (This just coming from painful high-school memories!)

    I think if you're advocating a dairy-dense approach, you've simply GOT to find grass-fed, full-fat kefir. The fermentation destroys the IGF-1 and makes digestion and assimilation that much easier. Whole foods has g-f kefir but it's lowfat. Local dairies (find at realmilk.com or eatwild.com) can provide full-fat grass-fed milk and often kefir grains. A little research and initial legwork could save a LOT of hurt. A good guy to look up is Dane at GarageStrength.com. He has lots of success with traditional, fermented foods and high-level athletes of all ages.

  6. #36
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    Also, if you have limited access to a weight room, look up Hershal Walker's history prior to joining the NFL. All he did was bodyweight workouts, and he was one of the strongest/fastest football players in history.

    Dont underestimate the power of body weight. If you are interested, "Never Gymless" by Ross Enaimait.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaveGirlEats View Post
    Just my .02...but I really think that much milk for a kid could contribute to pro-acne conditions if it's conventional milk. You may get the kiddo on the team, but a whole host of other self-esteem issues could result (This just coming from painful high-school memories!)
    In my experience the acne causing effects are due to not enough Retinol(vit A). I was drinking grass fed raw milk for a couple months and started to get horrible acne so I stopped. A couple months later I started taking 10k iu retinol daily and decided to try milk again, to my surprise there was absolutely no acne this time, yet I was drinking pasteurized conventional skim milk. I still do about 1/2 gallon of pasteurized non-homogenized milk daily and my face is the clearest its ever been.

    Just my .02

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by achilles.kealoha View Post
    Also, if you have limited access to a weight room, look up Hershal Walker's history prior to joining the NFL. All he did was bodyweight workouts, and he was one of the strongest/fastest football players in history.

    Dont underestimate the power of body weight. If you are interested, "Never Gymless" by Ross Enaimait.
    Never gymless is fantastic.

    Hershel Walker not an example anyone can or should follow.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apex Predator View Post
    Never gymless is fantastic.

    Hershel Walker not an example anyone can or should follow.
    Haha, maybe we should recommend the boy studies the intellectual progression of Plaxico Buress, next.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apex Predator View Post
    Never gymless is fantastic.

    Hershel Walker not an example anyone can or should follow.
    As a total outsider, and just ouf of curiosity, who is Hershel Walker and what did he do wrong that others should not follow? Based on a quick image search he sure looks like a fit guy.

    Best regards,
    Dan

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