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Thread: Carbs and Metabolic function page 2

  1. #11
    Conan's Avatar
    Conan Guest

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    Primal Fuel


    Nick,


    I've been lifting weights for 15 years and no routine I've tried has generated the gains I've seen from Crossfit. It also happened to change my body faster than any other fitness regimen I've tried (I credit my Paleo/primal diet with a lot of that as well). Let me warn you about a couple of things though:


    1. Due to the intensity and very heavy weights you are working with, it is pretty easy to injure yourself. My girlfriend and I have both suffered minor injuries on multiple occassions. So start slow and ease your way into it. If you are competitive, you are probably going to try to keep up with the big boys and end up w/ an injury. You will get beat by girls when you are first starting so check your ego at the door.

    2. Some of the gyms suggest 5-6 crossfit sessions / week and that crossfit is all the working out you should do. Due to the intensity involved I think this is too much volume and leads to #1 and also slows muscle building (you will find that many Crossfitters, while insanely strong, do not have huge muscles). Peronsally, I have seen major strength gains w/ Crossfit 2-3 times/week and heavy lifting sessions 2-3 times / week with an occassional sprint workout.

    3. If you are an endurance athlete, do Crossfit endurance. The normal crossfit workouts don't really build endurance for activities that last more than 30 minutes.


  2. #12
    Trinkwasser's Avatar
    Trinkwasser Guest

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    Never heard of him!


    On the other hand I HAVE heard of Eric C Westman of Duke, currently a leading 21st century dietary and metabolic researcher


    http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/75/5/951-a


    I can only speak personally but my body agrees with him. Oh wait, so do several hundred if not several thousand other bodies


  3. #13
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    the warrior diet is a pretty good plan. For those unfamiliar with it, Ori suggest undereating during the day and eating a large meal at night.


    The main tip that I personally learned from the book was that it is ok to be hungry during the day and to skip breakfast when not hungry. I had been locked into a pattern of eating three meals per day and for a while was going from meal to meal eating without even being hungry.


    Otherwise, during the day, when hungry eat preferably in this order vegetables, fruit or light protein like eggs, yougurt or kefir. So as to lessen the impact on the body's detoxification that started the previous night.


    At night, for dinner, he suggests eating from all of the food groups however, he suggests a certain order of eating, if at all fruit first, then vegetables, then meat and finally carbs last. He also is against processed foods, sugar etc.


  4. #14
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
    OnTheBayou is offline Senior Member
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    I don't think Grok gave a damn what he ate when.


    Too much trouble and discipline considering I am doing great with PB. Sooooooo EZ.


  5. #15
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    I like the Blueprint better myself. Although, there was a tremendous freedom in allowing myself to not eat during the day and then eating my main meal at night with my family. That experience is not contradicted by the blueprint at all and Mark is an advocate of IF.


    Ori uses his own metaphor in his book about carrying the kill/meat home and cooking it around a fire and eating together with the tribe, which in his book takes place at night.


    To my way of thinking, the diets have more in common than less in common.


  6. #16
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    Nick Guest

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    Huh, I guess I lost track of this thread.


    Ecala: I'm an electrical engineer, but my wife defends her thesis in cancer biology in a couple of days. She works on metabolism and apoptosis (programmed cell death), and it involves a lot of the same pathways of interest in carb/calorie restriction (Glut1/Glut4, PI3K/Akt, etc.). I edit her papers, she talks over experiments with me, etc. so a good bit rubs off. And I have someone to at least ask for pointers if I'm not sure about something, or need to find a good paper. As a consequence my main social group also tends to be a bunch of biology PhD's and MD/PhD's.

    Also I've kinda tried digest everything Mark has written, as well as most of what Stephan Guyenet, Dave Dixon, Chris Masterjohn, and Dr. Eades write about on their blogs.

    Definitely don't think I'm an expert beyond reproach about any of this; that's why I try to post links to source material when I can.


    Conan: I don't think anyone mentioned Crossfit before your post. Was that reply supposed to go into another thread?


  7. #17
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    Conan Guest

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    Yeah, it looks like that comment ended up on the wrong thread. Not sure how that happened.


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