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Thread: Why is corn a grain? page 2

  1. #11
    DarthFriendly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leida View Post
    Native Americains also fared just fine on beans and squashes. And I doubt any paleolithic ansector of ours cooked his mushrooms in butter or cured his bacon and then fried in his frying pan.

    The idea is to cut out stuff that carries low nutritional load with a high caloric tag and stuff that harms your system. 99% of the time. I believe, corn is in the 'too much calories for just sugar and gods know what else & antinutrients' along with the other garins and grass-seeds.
    Agreed.

    Native strains of maize combined with a lifestyle of intense regular physical activity, and LOTS of animal food probably got the carbs burned off pretty well.

    Modern "Round Up Read" corn, probably not so much.

  2. #12
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    Yes, modern corn is a whole different creature. Corn is interesting if you're a history buff - it was one of the first "selectively bred" organisms, and today's corn looks nothing like its ancient cousins.

    There's a good summary here: Quintessence of Dust: They selected teosinte...and got corn. Excellent!

  3. #13
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    The simple answer is: Grains are the seeds of grasses. Corn is a grass, corn kernels are grains.

    Mesoamericans treated their corn by soaking it in a limewater (alkaline) solution prior to grinding or cooking. This neutralized the anti-nutrients, making the minerals and other nutrients more bioavailable, helping it to be a healthier source of calories. If you buy masa in the store (corn flour used to make tortillas) it is pretreated with lime in this way (and that is not the fruit).

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barb View Post
    The simple answer is: Grains are the seeds of grasses. Corn is a grass, corn kernels are grains.

    Mesoamericans treated their corn by soaking it in a limewater (alkaline) solution prior to grinding or cooking. This neutralized the anti-nutrients, making the minerals and other nutrients more bioavailable, helping it to be a healthier source of calories. If you buy masa in the store (corn flour used to make tortillas) it is pretreated with lime in this way (and that is not the fruit).
    +1
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barb View Post
    The simple answer is: Grains are the seeds of grasses. Corn is a grass, corn kernels are grains.

    Mesoamericans treated their corn by soaking it in a limewater (alkaline) solution prior to grinding or cooking. This neutralized the anti-nutrients, making the minerals and other nutrients more bioavailable, helping it to be a healthier source of calories. If you buy masa in the store (corn flour used to make tortillas) it is pretreated with lime in this way (and that is not the fruit).
    What Barb said.

    Alton Brown has a couple episodes of corn that is fascinating, and where I first learned about nixtamalization (the treating of maize with limewater).

    Good Eats S2E14P1: Ear Apparent - YouTube (just about corn)
    Good Eats Season 10 Ep1 (1/2) - YouTube (about nixtamalization)
    Last edited by onalark; 08-31-2011 at 04:51 PM.

  6. #16
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    So green beans and sugar snap peas are both legumes, yet most will think they are a fine part of a primal diet (rather than the matured, dried seeds).

    Should we think of corn the same way? That is, is corn on the cob OK, but not matured, dried, ground corn seeds?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneDeltaTenTango View Post
    So green beans and sugar snap peas are both legumes, yet most will think they are a fine part of a primal diet (rather than the matured, dried seeds).

    Should we think of corn the same way? That is, is corn on the cob OK, but not matured, dried, ground corn seeds?
    Personally, I do! Though that's more a choice saying... I don't care if it's primal or not. I won't eat a lot of it, but when sweet corn is in season and fresh picked there's not much better! I have some standing exceptions for certain foods, like my flour-based cinnamon rolls on Christmas morning. I consider corn on the cob part of my 20%.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barb View Post
    The simple answer is: Grains are the seeds of grasses. Corn is a grass, corn kernels are grains.

    Mesoamericans treated their corn by soaking it in a limewater (alkaline) solution prior to grinding or cooking. This neutralized the anti-nutrients, making the minerals and other nutrients more bioavailable, helping it to be a healthier source of calories. If you buy masa in the store (corn flour used to make tortillas) it is pretreated with lime in this way (and that is not the fruit).
    So wait...you can use masa and not worry about any antinutrients in your food?? That would put it on the level of potatoes for somebody buying from Safeway.

  9. #19
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    The Story of Corn - History Detective
    "Corn as we know it today would not exist if it weren't for the humans that cultivated and developed it. It is a human invention, a plant that does not exist naturally in the wild. It can only survive if planted and protected by humans.

    Scientists believe people living in central Mexico developed corn at least 7000 years ago. It was started from a wild grass called teosinte. Teosinte looked very different from our corn today. The kernels were small and were not placed close together like kernels on the husked ear of modern corn."

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by springnr View Post
    The Story of Corn - History Detective
    "Corn as we know it today would not exist if it weren't for the humans that cultivated and developed it. It is a human invention, a plant that does not exist naturally in the wild. It can only survive if planted and protected by humans.

    Scientists believe people living in central Mexico developed corn at least 7000 years ago. It was started from a wild grass called teosinte. Teosinte looked very different from our corn today. The kernels were small and were not placed close together like kernels on the husked ear of modern corn."
    Exactly. Corn is a neolithic invention which we are better off not eating at all.
    Re green beans and sugar snap peas, the PB says that they are fine because you are really eating more of the pod than the pea, the pod being vegetable matter.

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