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Thread: The Real Primal Diet page

  1. #1
    uksahkka's Avatar
    uksahkka is offline Junior Member
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    Exclamation The Real Primal Diet

    Primal Fuel
    O.K., I have a few questions so I hope you can all help. I live in a remote area of Alaska; I hunt and live off of subsistence including moose, deer, halibut, rockfish, salmon, shrimp, and crab. I have no problem finding clean and lean meat. The difficulty I have is finding fresh and healthy produce. Ugh! It is so frustrating. By the time produce arrives to our island it has been shipped across the U.S. and then put on a barge for another week before it arrives here. Often times the produce is rotting on the shelf or spoils before we can eat it. Also, produce is very expensive and cost prohibitive for many families. I bought a head of cauliflower and 2 small bunches of green onions yesterday: I paid almost $8.00.

    I do gather wild berries in the summer and we have wild vegetables which we can pick in spring (fiddle heads, devil's club, spruce tips, and salmonberry shoots). Once fall gets here the berries are gone. This year was exceptionally wet and many of the berry plants did not bear fruit. I even planted a garden but the weather prevented anything from growing, I am still holding out hope for the pumpkins. I noticed in the book that we should limit dried fruit. What about drying our own fruit? If I dry the berries I pick in the summer can I eat them without worrying about how much I eat? Also, what about smoked meat? Sometimes this is the only way for us to preserve our fish so we don't have to refridgerate.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    peril's Avatar
    peril is offline Senior Member
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    If you eat nose-to-tail you can get by without plants. Of course, eat them when they're available but don't sweat when they're not
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

  3. #3
    LisaLS's Avatar
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    Have you thought about maybe building a small green house so you can grow your own veggies?
    Heck, right now I'm growing bell peppers in a pot inside the house w/ nothing but a small half gallon pot and potting soil. I'm sure it would be better outside, but ya gotta work with what ya got
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  4. #4
    uksahkka's Avatar
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    Eating nose-to-tail is fine until you experience palate fatigue. There are times I just can't eat another piece of moose!

  5. #5
    uksahkka's Avatar
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    Thanks, I am trying to grow cherry tomatoes. I think growing something inside would be beneficial.

  6. #6
    Scotty's Avatar
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    Canning and root vegetables. If you are smoking the meats yourself so you can control the ingredients, absolutely.

  7. #7
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    I spent the majority of 2010 (spring, summer, fall) living in interior Alaska/Yukon Territory so I can appreciate your predicament. The small settlement where I was in Alaska had the road wash out so the only way in was by bush plane. That meant provisions as well. There was a small trading post and things were priced more according to weight than product. I recall getting by on a lot of canned goods and frozen veg, but it was expensive. I knew my cheese habit would be broken when an 8oz brick was $12.

    Most of the year round residents there ate a lot of smoked meat and salmon. They used Alder wood and it smelled heavenly. I can't imagine that would be bad. I also think the dried fruit would be okay, too, in moderation.

    In the Yukon, a lot of people had gardens and grew what they could while they could. I've never seen such big cabbage.

    By the way, my avatar is me in Alaska in May with a little snow man friend on my shoulder.
    kiss = keep it simple, sister!

  8. #8
    uksahkka's Avatar
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    I can carrots. I have an autoimmune disease so legumes and potato are out of the picture. I will have to check into canning other veggies and fruits. Thanks.

  9. #9
    zoebird's Avatar
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    i agree with canning as much as you can from what you gather. berry jams are a staple of scandinavian diets (pre-modern conveniences) over winter. also, if you can grow cabbages and the like, it would go a long way. and i second either A. greenhouse, or B. indoor gardening (with lamps, etc).

  10. #10
    Catherine's Avatar
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    can i come live with you? that lifestyle sounds sort of fantastically perfect.

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