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Thread: Curing Hypothyroidism

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  1. #1
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    Curing Hypothyroidism

    Is this a possibility using PB Nutrition? It would be nice to get off meds.

    Thanks for any suggestions.

  2. #2
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    My meds have decreased fairly steadily since starting primal, but it is hard for me to know if this is related to weight or to underlying healing. I have been one of these people who have tended to yoyo in the level of med I have needed, so having a continual decrease is good. I have gone from 50mg cytomel (T3) down to 36.25 mg per day, and I am due for another blood test in another couple of weeks. I am feeling like I have stabilized, and if I have that is ok with me. Needing to take no meds would be great, but even getting to the point where the meds I need are stable would be wonderful. I have the sense that if it is possible, it may take a long time, and probably depends on if there was permanent damage done.
    Karin

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  3. #3
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    You should the read the articles about hypothyroidism on the Perfect Health Diet website. Here's a link to all of them: Hypothyroidism | Perfect Health Diet

  4. #4
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    I'd recommend reading the book "Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms When My Lab Tests Are Normal" by Datis Kharrazian. It covers all 6 types of hypothyroid patterns (and 22 sub patterns), which most docs are clueless about. It's very eye-opening!
    Primal is def. a huge step in the right direction, but, honestly, you need to see a functional health practitioner to know which tests to give you and how to properly interpret them. Your hypothyroidism also may have an autoimmune component.
    I didn't make any thyroid headway being Primal until I saw a functional doc who diagnosed me with Hashimoto's and got my immune system balanced, as well as worked on my neurotransmitters and adrenals. I still have room for improvement, but I'm finally a functioning person again!

    Chris Kresser (The Healthy Skeptic) would be an excellent person to do a consult with: http://chriskresser.com/

  5. #5
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    "Hypothyroidism is the disease state in humans and animals caused by insufficient production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid gland. Cretinism is a form of hypothyroidism found in infants.

    There are several distinct causes for chronic hypothyroidism. Historically, and still in many developing countries, iodine deficiency is the most common cause of hypothyroidism worldwide. In present day developed countries, however, hypothyroidism is mostly caused by Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or by a lack of the thyroid gland or a deficiency of hormones from either the hypothalamus or the pituitary.

    Hypothyroidism can result from postpartum thyroiditis, a condition that affects about 5% of all women within a year after giving birth. The first phase is typically hyperthyroidism. Then, the thyroid either returns to normal or a woman develops hypothyroidism. Of those women who experience hypothyroidism associated with postpartum thyroiditis, one in five will develop permanent hypothyroidism requiring life-long treatment.

  6. #6
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    I am one of the 5% who experienced postpartum thyroid issues. I see a natural/conventional doctor who has me on Armour Thyroid as opposed to Synthroid. I feel better at least knowing it's less synthetic (comes from dessicated pig thyroid). It's true thyroid issues usually accompany other autoimmune problems. I experience Raynaud's syndrome, mild psoriasis and adrenal fatigue. I have to say since going Primal that everything has leveled off a bit. My skin and energy are better, and I'm curious to see what my next blood test reveals. I don't expect to ever be rid of my hypothyroid but I do feel this lifestyle is helping me manage it.

  7. #7
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    If you're hypothyroid, you aren't taking 'meds,' your Rx is actually thyroid hormones, replaces those your thyroid is not producing. Unless your hypo is caused by some temporary bodily disturbance (rare), no dietary adjustments will 'cure' you. Once you begin hormonal replacement, it is almost always for life because your body adjusts to the incoming hormones.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by emmie View Post
    If you're hypothyroid, you aren't taking 'meds,' your Rx is actually thyroid hormones, replaces those your thyroid is not producing. Unless your hypo is caused by some temporary bodily disturbance (rare), no dietary adjustments will 'cure' you. Once you begin hormonal replacement, it is almost always for life because your body adjusts to the incoming hormones.
    Not true.

    Recovery of Pituitary Thyrotropic Function after Withdrawal of Prolonged Thyroid-Suppression Therapy, Apostolos G. Vagenakis, M.D, N Engl J Med 1975; 293:681-684October 2, 1975
    Recovery of Pituitary Thyrotropic Function after Withdrawal of Prolonged Thyroid-Suppression Therapy

    Detectable values of serum thyrotropin ( <1.2 μU per milliliter) and a normal 131I uptake usually occurred concurrently in two to three weeks. Serum thyroxine concentration returned to normal at least four weeks after hormone withdrawal.

    Also...

    Patterns of Recovery of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis in Patients Taken off Chronic Thyroid Therapy, LAWRENCE G. KRUGMAN, Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism Vol. 41, No. 1 70-80, 1975

    Patterns of Recovery of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis in Patients Taken off Chronic Thyroid Therapy

    In euthyroid non-goitrous patients, the mean duration of suppressed TSH response to TRH (maximum TSH < 8 U/ml) was 12 4 (SE) days after stopping thyroid hormone and the mean time to recovery of normal TSH response to TRH (maximum TSH > 8 U/ml) was 16 5 days. None of the euthyroid nongoitrous patients ever hyperresponded to TRH; normal at least four weeks after hormone withdrawal.

    Also you can look at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6806430 and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1418111/
    Last edited by ryanmercer; 10-30-2013 at 04:14 AM.
    -Ryan Mercer my blog and Genco Peptides my small biz

  9. #9
    This seems almost too good to be true! So, it is possible to heal your body through drastic diet and lifestyle changes?? You don't know the hope this gives me!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by UpErMei View Post
    This seems almost too good to be true! So, it is possible to heal your body through drastic diet and lifestyle changes?? You don't know the hope this gives me!
    I'm still here! I think managing hypo-T depends mostly on if it's an auto-immune problem or a lifestyle problem. If you ask me, your main issues (hypothyroidism, PCOS, anxiety & depression) all point toward a 'leaky gut'. Work on getting your diet rock solid with enough carbs to fuel you, and avoid processed sugars, oils, and wheat like the plague! Eat lots of fermented foods, take a couple different probiotics, and a couple prebiotics. Even if this isn't your problem, it takes a huge chunk out of the equation--I know for me that getting my gut right was a huge step in the right direction.

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