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Thread: All Natural Heavy Whipping Cream - Are Jersey cows grassfed? page 2

  1. #11
    primalblonde's Avatar
    primalblonde is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdovers View Post
    Have you checked out this site to see if you live near a farm that sells raw milk?

    Where Can I Find Real (Raw) Milk?

    I have one only 20 miles away and we go up there every Saturday and get raw milk and raw cream. It is heavenly stuff!!!!

    BTW Jersey cows have a higher butter fat content in their milk than holsteins and that makes for really nice creamy milk and thick cream. I got a really comprehensive cow lesson from the famer I buy the milk from. But, you have to ask what they are fed. Any breed can be grass-fed and that is what you primarily want. The bonus with grass-fed Jerseys is the high butter fat content of the milk and cream.
    Yeah, there's a farm market about 45 mins. away that has raw milk, but I've never tried it, so I didn't know if I should buy it or not. Is it as thick as heavy cream? Since you like it so much, I'm anxious to try it now! I emailed Promised Land, so hopefully I'll get an answer soon. Their heavy cream is soo good! I'm not getting my hopes up about it being grassfed, though.

  2. #12
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    Cream is the fatty part of the milk that floats on top, unless it has been skimmed off (skim milk) or homogenized, which means forced through a tiny-holed strainer to break the fat up so it doesn't rise anymore. There have been studies that indicated that homogenization doesn't allow your body to process that fat naturally, but I don't have any links for that.

    Skim milk has all the fat skimmed off. Conventional whole milk usually has all the fat skimmed off, then about 3.5-4% added back. Low-fat milk is usually 1-2%.

    A natural cow's milk is usually about 4% butterfat, give or take a bit. Some cows are as high as 7%. The butterfat that isn't put back onto the milk is used to make butter, or sold as cream.

    Non-homogenized, or cream line (because you can see the line where the cream and the milk separate) milk tastes completely different from homogenized milk, but it can be hard to find sometimes.

  3. #13
    primalblonde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfreaksho View Post
    Cream is the fatty part of the milk that floats on top, unless it has been skimmed off (skim milk) or homogenized, which means forced through a tiny-holed strainer to break the fat up so it doesn't rise anymore. There have been studies that indicated that homogenization doesn't allow your body to process that fat naturally, but I don't have any links for that.

    Skim milk has all the fat skimmed off. Conventional whole milk usually has all the fat skimmed off, then about 3.5-4% added back. Low-fat milk is usually 1-2%.

    A natural cow's milk is usually about 4% butterfat, give or take a bit. Some cows are as high as 7%. The butterfat that isn't put back onto the milk is used to make butter, or sold as cream.

    Non-homogenized, or cream line (because you can see the line where the cream and the milk separate) milk tastes completely different from homogenized milk, but it can be hard to find sometimes.
    Interesting! But I'm confused. Are you saying it is a good choice bc it has a good bit of fat or it's not a good choice bc it's not raw?

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