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    DeeEm's Avatar
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    Uh.. what does kale look like? (non-English speaker)

    Hi everyone.

    Having a bit of trouble putting my finger on just what kale is, locally (I live in Spain).

    Let's see... my first attempt at buying it, which was today, turned up this:

    http://lh6.ggpht.com/__YwOO7zVeoY/SH...BoyQ/Berza.jpg
    (removed inline image 'cause it was huge... click on the link for a pícture)

    That is what is locally known as berza or col rizada.

    Have I bought kale, or something else entirely? Having my first taste of it just now, I used the outer leaves (as opposed to throwing them away), gave them a good scrubbing (I did find a couple tiny bugs but I figure it's normal - I just hope the rest of them don't take over my fridge!), chopped them up and and steamed them in a cup in the microwave, the way I sometimes eat cabbage.

    Added a handful of (cooked) white rice (YES, I know... I just wanted some rice, 'k? ), a couple spoonfuls of olive oil, salt, pepper, and a healthy helping of paprika, mixed it all up and... it's good! The leaves, these at least, are quite meaty, and it is bitter-ish, but I like the taste. I want to try it raw in a salad, but I figured it'd be a good idea to try it cooked first - just in case it didn't agree with me straight away.

    So, anyway... back to the original question, can anyone confirm whether the picture above is of what the English-speaking world knows as kale?

    Thanks!!


    D

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    Frilly! :P
    I'm a paleo foodie, come check out my recipes: http://strangekitty.ca/

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    Farfalla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeEm View Post
    Hi everyone.

    Having a bit of trouble putting my finger on just what kale is, locally (I live in Spain).
    As you see in the second post, Americans use the word "kale" for something else. In my country kale looks like in Spain. I've tried both and found our variant (the head) tastier. One of my favorite recipes: Use butter to fry some onions, then add cubed pork shoulder, let it brown, and add shredded kale. Season to taste (salt, pepper). Add water but not much, just so the food does not burn (I use a crockpot and do not need any water at all). Cook until the kale is mashy and the meat is tender. It is really good!
    Last edited by Farfalla; 08-24-2011 at 03:05 PM.

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    DeeEm's Avatar
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    You're making my mouth water, and I've JUST HAD DINNER.

    Awesome. Will keep in mind.

    Thanks!!

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    The first picture is savoy cabbage...fairly similar but slightly softer texture.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gingernut View Post
    The first picture is savoy cabbage...fairly similar but slightly softer texture.
    .... and much, much nicer - not a lover of kale as you can probably tell!

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    kale, images - Google Search


    Hay muchas clases de 'kale'.

    En el EEUU estoy acostumbrado a comiendo el tipo que aparece en el primer retrato de la segunda fila.
    Tayatha om bekandze

    Bekandze maha bekandze

    Randza samu gate soha

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    Kale is much better if you pick it after a light frost. It makes sugar as a form of anti-freeze. In warm weather, kale is awfully bitter. You could boil it and change the water to get some of the bitters out of it, but I prefer to eat it raw in salads during fall and spring when there is a little bit of frost at night.

    Kale doesn't head up, so you can pick leaves and it will grow more. I like "Red Russian Kale" the best. It's really a mixture of light purple and gray-green.

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    DeeEm's Avatar
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    So would this savoy cabbage be comparable, nutritionally, to 'proper' kale? I do believe that they're from the same family (brassica oleracea or something like that), from what little I've just read.

    Thanks!

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    You've also got cavolo nero, aka black kale, aka black cabbage, aka Tuscan cabbage, which is my favourite. It has a much softer, almost velvet like leafe and gentler flavour.

    In fact, last weekend I planted several seedlings of both the cavolo nero and curly (or scots) kale varieties in my new veggie patch

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