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Thread: State of Ohio Guidelines page

  1. #1
    CoS's Avatar
    CoS
    CoS is offline Senior Member
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    State of Ohio Guidelines

    I had to share this little tidbit. I am living at home with my family this summer (I'm a college student), and our household is fostering an infant. She is on WIC, the food assistance program for children here in the state of Ohio. Well, they gave my mom some pamphlets with recipes for fruits and veggies. My family, except me, doesn't each a lot of veggies, so she figured I would want it. I'm a public policy student and a health nut, I thought I would browse through it and see how the Great State of Ohio is trying to improve the health of our young and underprivileged Buckeyes.

    Shittiest....recipes....ever.

    The papers were a total advertisement for whatever farming industries paid big to the legislators last year. Tons of corn and tomato-based suggestions! Corn is obviously a no-no, and I love me some tomatoes, but the variety offered was horrendous! And most of the recipes were ruined with the advice to "saute in vegetable or corn oil" or "mix berries with LOW-FAT yogurt" (their emphasis.)

    The veggies and fruit by themselves are great, but nearly every single suggested ingredient one could add to make it a dish was awful.

    Just my gripe for the day. Sorry.

  2. #2
    iniQuity's Avatar
    iniQuity is offline Senior Member
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    Still amazes me how simplistic the whole world is when it comes to fats. I mean, obviously I fell victim to that group-think as well...

    "I'm fat... so I shouldn't eat fat, yep that makes sense to me"

    I've said it before and I'll say it again, I really wish we had different words for dietary fat and fat on your bodies (or that we actually used "adipose tissue" to describe fat on our bodies as part of regular lexicon) because it's hard to blame people for making that association. Even in my native tongue, Spanish, "grasa" means both dietary fat and body fat.

    People that speak other languages besides English and Spanish, is the same true for your language and culture?

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