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Thread: Local food and winter in Canada page

  1. #1
    onelasttime's Avatar
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    or any cold climate...


    In the summer, I am a member of a local organic CSA and purchase all of my fruits and veggies from them but now that it is winter I am conflicted about what to buy. I just found a local CSA with winter shares and I thought it sounded pretty good although there are some higher carb or 20% items - beets, carrots, onions, garlic, potatoes, leeks, cabbage, parsnips, squash, celeriac, rutabagas, salsify, parsley root, winter radish, Jerusalem artichokes, dry beans and dried herbs.


    What about greenhouse greens, peppers, tomatoes, etc? Frozen berries and stored apples as fruit?


    The other problem I encountered is my grass fed beef source is now grain finished until spring - due to the lack of grass.


    What do you do or what are your thoughts on the cold climate matters?


  2. #2
    Annika's Avatar
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    I live in Vermont, which certainly qualifies as a cold climate (6 below out there right now - Fahrenheit!). Local eating is very important to me; I have a blog about local eating and started a local organization that works to increase production and consumption of local food. Winter is tough. I hardly shop at the store in summer and fall, but choices dwindle come December. Luckily, we now have a winter farmer's market once a month, but choices for veggie are pretty much limited to the types of thing you listed above. No one near me is doing any serious winter gardening in the Eliot Coleman style, or has winter greenhouses. I know that greens can be grown year-round in a solar greenhouse in southern Massachusetts using no supplemental light or heat - I've done it. In Vermont and Canada, it's colder and there's even less light, so it would be harder.


    Planning ahead is your best tactic. I freeze tons of berries, as well as some greens and tomatoes. If you have time in the fall you can put up a lot of food. However, I end up buying veggies at the co-op or supermarket starting in December. Even my kale, the cold-hardiest plant out there, is too covered with snow to pick now. Local meat, eggs, and dairy products - no problem. Veggies and fruits - not so easy.


    On a side note, when I did my first Eat Local Challenge, the biggest problem was the grains. Hardly anyone grows grains in New England. Now that I am mostly Primal, the lack of local grains is no problem at all!

    My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
    On Twitter: @NEKLocalvore

  3. #3
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    Or, move to Florida?


    Not that FL isn't overpopulated now.......


    Believe it or not last spring our tomatoes at my primary grocer was coming from...............Canada! Hothouse tomatoes from Canada instead of Florida grown. Made me cry.


    Our "winter" is the summer. Herbs still flourish, but the faves don't do so well in the heat/humidity. Right now I am picking cherry tomatoes and medium sized conventional, rosemary, chives, spearmint, basil, and any day now, jalapenos. And I get all the starfruit (carambola) I want two doors away.


  4. #4
    onelasttime's Avatar
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    @OTB trying to make me jealous?


    You have Canadian tomatoes in Florida while my grocery store carries Mexican tomatoes even though I live only an hour and a half away from the "tomato capital of Canada".


    I am going to learn how to can so that next summer I can stockpile veggies.


  5. #5
    Anand Srivastava's Avatar
    Anand Srivastava is offline Senior Member
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    I am coming to Canada in Late Jan or early Feb :-(.


    I was thinking that I could get some grass fed beef.


    Anyway I will try to be as paleo as possible, with whatever is available in the Malls.


    @onelasttime

    What would be better options than mall meats or vegetables?


  6. #6
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    @Anand

    Depending on where you are coming to, I would suggest looking for farmer's markets (check with the seller where the food is from), community share agriculture (CSA) programs and Good Food Box programs. Most stores label where items are from but I find that the sign above doesn't always match the sticker on the item.


    You can also look for restaurants that have an interest in local foods.


  7. #7
    fbw's Avatar
    fbw
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    jerusalem artichokes are not that carb-y. they are a kinda interesting starch, like potatoes in flavor, but more fibrous and so basically quite primal enough.


  8. #8
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    Winter in northern climes just leads me to eat more carnivorously. It fits with our biology, certainly with my N. European heritage (and I still think humans are far more similar than different, so we benefit from carnivorous nutrition). I'm in the Black HIlls (western) SD and eating whole carcass grass fed beef and game seems to give me all I need to be vital all winter long!


  9. #9
    Anand Srivastava's Avatar
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    @onelasttime


    I will be in Ottawa. I was thinking due to the cold most farmers market will be closed.


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