Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 25 of 25

Thread: Okay, what's up with nitrite/nitrates? page 3

  1. #21
    nina_70's Avatar
    nina_70 Guest

    1

    Shop Now


    The whole nitrate/nitrite problem, as I understand it, has more to do w/ something called nitrosamines than the nitrates/nitrites themselves. As mentioned above, if we eat greens, we generally get quite alot of nitrates from our food, even if we never touch cured meat. *Some* people are sensitive to nitrates, and you could (theoretically) overdose w/ nitrate-toxicity, but that's rare.


    So...it comes down to nitrosamines and this is where most of the cancer-scare stuff comes in. Under certain conditions proteins, or specifically amines, can combine w/ nitrites to form nitrosamines, and nitrosamine has been shown to be carcinogenic in animals.
    [quote]

    Most nitrosamines are mutagens and a number are transplacental carcinogens. Most are organ specific. For instance, dimethylnitrosamine causes liver cancer in experimental animals, whereas some of the tobacco specific nitrosamines cause lung cancer.
    </blockquote>


    It&#39;s thought that there&#39;s more chance for this combination in cured meats (because they&#39;ve got both protein & nitrates in them), but not all cured meats form nitrosamines under all conditions.
    [quote]

    Nitrosamines are produced from nitrites and secondary amines, which often occur in the form of proteins. Their formation can occur only under certain conditions, including strongly acidic conditions such as that of the human stomach. High temperatures, as in frying, can also enhance the formation of nitrosamines.
    </blockquote>


    Read more here:

    http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/f-w00/nitrosamine.html

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/distrib...on/DJ0974.html

    http://www.answers.com/topic/nitrosamine


    By the way ascorbic acid inhibits the production of nitrosamines.
    [quote]

    the USDA now requires adding ascorbic acid (vitamin C) or erythorbic acid to bacon cure, a practice that greatly reduces the formation of nitrosamines.
    </blockquote>


    So, it&#39;s not so much the nitrates we need to worry about, but the nitrosamines. However, it&#39;s not clear how much exposure we get to nitrosamines, and how much of an impact it has on our health. General info seems to suggest nitrosamine amounts in foods are low. But, the potential is there esp. for reaction in the stomach. So, I guess that&#39;s where most of the nitrate-free stuff comes in. I do tend to buy uncured bacon myself.


  2. #22
    nina_70's Avatar
    nina_70 Guest

    1



    From kuno1chi:
    [quote]

    In addition, bodybuilders actually supplement with NO2
    </blockquote>


    Just a quick note on this. When bodybuilders talk about nitric oxide supplementation they&#39;re talking about something completely different than nitrates/nitrites. What they are trying to do is to increase nitric oxide (NO) production in their vascular system. This isn&#39;t linked to cured meat or nitrates. NO is a gas that is produced in the inner lining of the blood vessels and serves some really critical functions in the body incl. blood vessel dilation and neurotransmission between cells. Natural NO production is enhanced through exercise and can also (potentially) be enhanced by certain amino acids and drugs (e.g. Viagra). Bodybuilders supplement specific mixes of amino acids that are though to increase production of NO and so increase pump.

    http://www.chem.queensu.ca/chembook/articles/nitricoxide.htm


    Also, the whole nitric oxide and smoke ring in BBQ&#39;d/smoked meats is actually a reaction of nitrous acid w/ the pigment myoglobin, and it doesn&#39;t occur in all meats, or even in all smoked meats.

    http://www.ranchorocke.com/uploads/SmokeRing.pdf
    [quote]

    When a smoke ring develops in barbecue meats it is not because smoke has penetrated and

    colored the muscle, but rather because gases in the smoke interact with the pigment myoglobin.

    Two phenomenon provide evidence that it is not the smoke itself that causes the smoke ring.

    First, it is possible to have a smoke ring develop in a product that has not been smoked and

    second, it is also possible to heavily smoke a product without smoke ring development
    </blockquote>


    So, I wouldn&#39;t worry about nitrites from this source, anyway. You need quite a specific set of circumstances to get that smoke ring to form. And, even then, the levels are low.


  3. #23
    lesliek's Avatar
    lesliek is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Viroqua, WI
    Posts
    39

    1



    Don&#39;t most "uncured" products still have nitrates/nitrites in them (usually celery juice or salt)?


  4. #24
    kuno1chi's Avatar
    kuno1chi is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    4,498

    1



    @nina:


    My understanding was that ingested nitrites are converted by the body to nitrates and NO, causing a relaxation of smooth muscle tissue, etc.


    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...410b87bd68b0fa


  5. #25
    crunchysue's Avatar
    crunchysue Guest

    1



    @Sharonll mentioned Thundering Hooves (seller of pasture fed meats) in another post. They have a page explaining why they use nitrites in their cured meats, and how &#39;nitrite-free&#39; meats are really not. I found it very interesting, and will be doing more research into the issue. I currently buy uncured, &#39;nitrite-free&#39; bacon, but maybe it&#39;s not so important.


    http://www.thunderinghooves.net/about_nitrites.htm


Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •