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    jc2bg's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel


    I'm a relative newbie and not all that informed, but thought I'd share some recent food discoveries in a more or less primal vein. Feel free to chime in with your own experiences, comments, etc.


    Almond flour: there are a lot of online recipes using almond flour for a host of tasty things. After a month or so of virtually no baked goods other than some primal banana-nut bars, I thought it might help me to stay [more] primal in the long run if I baked something in the muffin line, so I found a reasonably affordable online source for almond flour, tried a simple muffin recipe, and found the results quite tasty and surprisingly filling. I want to try to buy in slightly larger bulk [than 1 lb. at a time] so I'll always have some on hand.


    Agave: Readily available in my local supermarket, and not cost-prohibitive. I do well now on staying away from true SAD sweets, but I can't stand coffee or tea (which I must have) without sweetening. Agave does the trick very nicely, and at least is more natural than Nutraweet, Splenda, etc. (or seems so). Also does very nicely in primal baked goods. A little goes a long way.


    Almond butter: Like the Agave and almond flour, almond butter is a very nice combination of slightly sweet and adds that extra zing to various baked items, plus it's versatile as a "dip," condiment, filler in smoothies, or just on a spoon as a snack. Can't find it locally in supermarkets, but readily available online, and I don't use much.


    Almond milk: This was my most surprising recent discovery. Several varieties to choose from in my local supermarket, same price range as soy milk, rice milk, and other specialty "milk" drinks. I got a variety that is 60 cals. in 8 oz., way lower carbs than cow's milk [and WAY lower than rice milk or soy milk]. I was prepared for it to have an awful taste, or at best a neutral/bland taste, but found instead that it is quite yummy. I can do without milk as a drink, but a little sip now and then is even nicer when it's in such a healthy/nutritious medium. I'm trying to trim my daily calories just a touch, and because I am an addict to creamer in my two or three cups of coffee or herbal tea per day, the almond milk helps me to cut carbs and calories at the same time. [My fat intake is high enough elsewhere.]


    Grapeseed oil: Also readily available and quite affordable at my local supermarket. I haven't heavily researched grapeseed oil, but at least a few sources claim advantages over olive oil, plus the grapeseed oil is very good for various kinds of cooking and baking. I love my good old butter, but in some baking etc. it's somewhat easier to use a liquid oil. Found the grapeseed oil to have a lovely, non-intrusive taste, and unless I learn that it's not a good thing to intake, I'm putting it in the somewhat useful column.


    Summary: I'm afraid that at this point, still away from home 12-ish hours a day and limited time to both shop and cook 100% primally, I'm just doing the best I can. Hoping for a lifestyle change next summer [onward] that will allow me to be much more careful and conscientious about primal eating. What I love most about this eating "pattern" is that virtually every new food choice that I try, at least with a view toward more primal eating, turns out to be quite tasty, quite satisfying, or both!


    Best. - JC


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    AmyMac703's Avatar
    AmyMac703 is offline Senior Member
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    Agave is not actually good for you since I think its like 90% fructose or something.

    On the occasion that I want to sweeten my tea, I use stevia (they have it available in liquid form which works nice for beverages).

    Subduction leads to orogeny

    My blog that I don't update as often as I should: http://primalclimber.blogspot.com/

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    go_ginger_go's Avatar
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    I'm a big fan of grapeseed oil. I hope others here can get on the grapeseed bandwagon as well.


    A new food to me that I really enjoyed:

    Celeriac.

    It's related to celery somehow (perhaps the root?).

    A root vegetable that tastes like mild, buttery celery. YUMZ.


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    Good point, Amy. The agave was an impulse purchase because it was included in a recipe that sounded enticing. It was touted [the agave nectar] as a very low glycemic index, but in fact, I now see that stevia is much lower. I'll go that way next time for sure.


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    Oh, gosh. The list of foods that I discovered since going Primal can make up a book. My most important one was grass-fed meats.


    Just an FYI on grapeseed oil, it is very high in PUFA and perhaps that's why many on this forum like to stay away from it or use it in moderation.

    Grapeseed oil consists of 17% MUFA; 71% PUFA; 12% SFA.


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    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    Agave Nectar: Marketing BS. It's 90+% fructose made by the same enzymed process that brings you high fructose corn syrup. It's disease and fat in a bottle. Ditch it.


    Grapeseed oil: First, no reason for it. Second, it IS a seed oil, even if not grain based. It is very high in PUFA's (polyunsaturated fatty acids), the worst kind for us. Other than it's high smoke point, it doesn't have anything in particular to suggest its use. If you want a neutral flavored oil, I'd suggest an olive oil Lite version.


    The only lipids in my house are organic butter, lard, olive oil, and coconut oil. All you need.


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    I recently discovered Sun Chokes a/k/a Jerusalem artichokes. From what I understand they are the root of a sunflower. They have a wonderful crunch to them and are slightly sweet tasting. I sliced some up into a salad the other day and they were great!


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    i'm eating things this year that i hadn't tried until now:

    -almond, cashew butter

    -almond, hemp, coconut milks

    -turnips, beetroot/greens, parsnips, kale, swiss chard

    -persimmon,medjool dates, flax, chia


    grocery shopping is exciting for me, i add a new fruit or veggie to my cart every week and switch up my greens so i don't get sick of spinach, romaine, etc.


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    Two other foods I'm starting to rely on for fill-ins and variety are jerky and hard cheese. On the cheese topic, I'm not totally convinced nor totally sure what "hard" or "soft" changes, but perhaps there's less lactose in the harder varieties? There are times that I'm hungry, planning to eat a meal in a while but can't speed up that process, and need something easy to grab that is also satisfying and semi-okay. Jerky, so long as it's not filled with unnatural additives, seems perfect, but the one dairy I dearly love is cheese. I like to get some chew or crunch with my calories; just seems so much more satisfying that way. - JC


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    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    I make my own jerky. Using Cube Steak, it is so very easy, just set your oven on low, figure out some kind of close spaced rack, and let 'er dry. I've made it after marinating in sauces and without, both are good.


    I've been able to cut way back on cheese. Two reasons I have wanted to. First is the high calories. Second is the sodium level. Holy cow! Turns out cheese was my main culprit. High sodium levels in food is anti-primal. Most natural foods are high in potassium and low in sodium.


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