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Thread: This is a test to see what's wrong with my legs page

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    HelloMeteor's Avatar
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    This is a test to see what's wrong with my legs

    Lie down on your back. Lift one leg up while keeping the leg straight. Do the quads flex much?

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    Alex Good's Avatar
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    Mine do.
    In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

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    HelloMeteor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Good View Post
    Mine do.
    I wasn't perfectly clear in the first post.

    I'm really referring to the two muscles near the kneecap. The vastus lateralis and the vastus medialis.

    Do they contract even if your leg isn't completely straight? If you life your leg and it's bent say 15 degrees off straight, are the quads near the kneecap still contracting? Are they contracting hard?

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    Alex Good's Avatar
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    Not hard but there is still a slight contraction.
    In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

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    HelloMeteor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Good View Post
    Not hard but there is still a slight contraction.
    Thanks. This is one of the few straight answers I've gotten. My lower quads are complete mush unless I fully extend my leg. And they're fairly well defined so it's pretty easy to tell.

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    Alex Good's Avatar
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    No problem.
    In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

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    Al_Kavadlo's Avatar
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    There is nothing unusual about what you are describing. The bottom parts of the quads don't cross the hip joint and therefore shouldn't be too active for this movement.
    "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

    "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

    My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com


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    Quote Originally Posted by Al_Kavadlo View Post
    There is nothing unusual about what you are describing. The bottom parts of the quads don't cross the hip joint and therefore shouldn't be too active for this movement.
    But it shouldn't be totally soft should it?

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    HelloMeteor's Avatar
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    I'd really like for more input from people on this. It only takes a second.

  10. #10
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    It will depend on how tight your hamstrings are. Lifting your leg like that stretches the hamstring (it crosses both the hip and the knee) which exerts a backward pressure on the tibia which needs to be counteracted by the quads. If I don't support my leg the quads tighten to keep the leg straight, but if I hold my ankle and pull it up that way the quad stays soft.

    EDIT: and yeah, as long as your legs do what you want them to do it's hard to say that you having an atypical morphology means you have something "wrong" with your legs. Worry about doing a movement, getting into a position you want, and let the mind worry about which muscles to fire.
    Last edited by AndreaReina; 07-28-2011 at 05:03 AM.

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