Page 3 of 25 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 250

Thread: Old Photos page 3

  1. #21
    Belforte's Avatar
    Belforte is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Naples (ITA), Melbourne (AUS)
    Posts
    263
    Primal Fuel
    Life. Be in it.

  2. #22
    geostump's Avatar
    geostump is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Ohio, its not the heart of it all
    Posts
    9,953
    My 2 youngest daughters and I seem to have strong faces. Even though their jaw structure isn't as strong as mine, they do seem to have stronger faces then most of their friends. My husband and oldest daughter don't seem to have that strong of facial structure except for maybe the nose. Looking at some of the younger women at work, they do seem to have slimmer faces and noses than what I have. Interesting stuff.
    Georgette

  3. #23
    Barb's Avatar
    Barb is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Seattle, WA USA
    Posts
    415
    If you all are interested in how diet and nutrition, as well as birth spacing, affects facial structure - read "Deep Nutrition, Why Our Bodies Need Traditional Foods" by Cate Shanahan. She goes into this at length. She has pictures of a family of about 8 siblings - she lines up all their high school senior photos and you can see the devolution of facial bone structure in the younger born children. The mother's body gets depleted, even on a good diet, and too many and too closely spaced births do not allow the mother time to replenish her stores. I highly recommend this book - she is a geneticist and explains how diet turns our genes on and off and what a good traditional diet does for us.

  4. #24
    Blackcatbone's Avatar
    Blackcatbone is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    2,192
    Yeah, I was thinking about that today. I have a really strong face, broad shoulders and hips. As kids we rarely got sugar, grew most of our own vegetables or bought from roadside stands. Never had fast food. My mother cooked with bacon fat, never bought lean cuts of meat. Also, we weren't allowed to hang out inside when the weather was decent. We were out most of the day, barefoot, dirty, climbing trees and fishing.

  5. #25
    geostump's Avatar
    geostump is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Ohio, its not the heart of it all
    Posts
    9,953
    Quote Originally Posted by Barb View Post
    If you all are interested in how diet and nutrition, as well as birth spacing, affects facial structure - read "Deep Nutrition, Why Our Bodies Need Traditional Foods" by Cate Shanahan. She goes into this at length. She has pictures of a family of about 8 siblings - she lines up all their high school senior photos and you can see the devolution of facial bone structure in the younger born children. The mother's body gets depleted, even on a good diet, and too many and too closely spaced births do not allow the mother time to replenish her stores. I highly recommend this book - she is a geneticist and explains how diet turns our genes on and off and what a good traditional diet does for us.
    I'm the youngest child in my family and am a totally different generation than the older 3 siblings. We all tend to have fairly strrong faces with mine and the oldest probably being the strongest. Third oldest sis has the softest/thinnest looking face yet she still has the strong nose. My oldest is 23 months older than my middle daughter and my middle and youngest daughters are 11.5 months apart. The oldest seems to have the softer face from the other 2 as she genetically takes after her fathers side more with my looks. Big head, fat cheeks, yet she picked up the nose from me. My younger 2 have stronger looking faces with the middle daughter having a very slim face with the strong nose. The youngest has very sharp features.
    Georgette

  6. #26
    Lewis's Avatar
    Lewis is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2,352
    I often notice very large mothers with elfin-like small children—the contrast is striking. So these are young women, but they clearly have a bad case of metabolic syndrome. Sometimes you'll see them pass a large sweetmeat of some sort—say, a damn great biscuit the size of an espresso coffee saucer—to the kid, often with some kind of boxed drink as well ... and you know it's only a matter of time before the diet catches up with the kid. So sad.

    The current situation seems to be that it's taking a few years for the food to catch up to the children.

    It would be an interesting exercise to look at a few photographs of current kindergarten children or children in the early years of schooling. I think most would be still look normal, but a few even of those would look rather too rounded and the situation would just get worse further up the school.

    I tried googling "reception class"—that's the name used in Britain for the children in the youngest class of formal schooling. This is what they call "rising five"—i.e., they will be five in the school year in which they start, so they're actually four-and-a-bit. *

    Most children of this age seem to look normal in the recent pictures I found—but not all even so young. This picture was taken in 2007:




    _____________________

    * Off topic, there's a huge issue here about the (I would say insane) current practice in Britain and some other countries of starting forced learning so young. I think most of the Scandinavian countries don't start the children on that till seven. The children would be far healthier—in all senses of the word—playing, and running about outside. Here's just one issue: some will probably develop semi-permanent distortions to their posture from trying to write when their coordination is not sufficiently developed to allow them to do so comfortably. Walk in a reception class and watch them writing in appallingly twisted and asymmetrical postures.

    Robert Carlyle in the film The Full Monty. Look how lop-sided he is!



    Who knows but that might have begun with a corkscrewed writing posture at four?
    Last edited by Lewis; 07-28-2011 at 10:31 AM.

  7. #27
    Shijin13's Avatar
    Shijin13 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NoVA
    Posts
    2,464
    Quote Originally Posted by MamaGrok View Post
    One thing Price noted was that in those on their traditional diets, family resemblances were very strong, even extending throughout an ethnicity to the extent that people of the same ethnicity but on different remote islands looked like siblings. But once nutrition became poor, family resemblances were much more random, and people tended to look more like others with their own particular facial weakness than members of their own family.
    MamaGrok - I find this very interesting... b/c when I look at pictures of dd - two ppl stand out in her face my cousin and grandmother. yes dd is my "mini me" but as shes growing I'm beginning to think she got my grandmother's nose...(and the majority of her facial expressions are my cousin's and grandmothers too) in todays view point her nose would be consider bulbous - when its just a larger button nose, wide spaced eyes - in general a well porpotioned face. DS has nice proportioned face as well... and DH IMO has a nice strong face - through probably not as strong as harrison ford/sean conery/daniel craig. I probably also have a strong face - as I'm not drop dead beautiful - but ppl tell me when I smile - I knock their socks off...

    I wonder if all those weak jaws - is a result of formula feeding, instead of bfing? lack of nutrients and crainofacial development nursing provides? ds 100% bf, where as dd b/c she could nurse received all the emb I could pump + formula... though she wouldn't take a bottle until 13wks - she was finger fed the first 12wks... We definately keep sugar out of the kids diets at home ( we don't have as much control at dcp - which mean the kids are getting more than I'd ever give them of sugar at dcp)

  8. #28
    MamaGrok's Avatar
    MamaGrok is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    atl
    Posts
    4,711
    Quote Originally Posted by Barb View Post
    The mother's body gets depleted, even on a good diet, and too many and too closely spaced births do not allow the mother time to replenish her stores.
    Sounds like a good book, Barb. Yes, it takes more than a good diet - it takes a superb one. Price found that among traditional peoples all over the world, the groups themselves were already eating a 100% unprocessed diet, but they fed even more super nutrient-dense foods to the men and women prior to conception, and to the pregnant and nursing women. And (nearly? I don't remember if there were exceptions) all spaced 2.5 - 3.5 years apart, which is the biological norm when following ecological breastfeeding.

    Shijin, sadly, breastfeeding is enough. Now that I know what to look for, I can look back to my children's infant pictures and see the weak chins from birth in several of them. They were all breastfed for at least 2 years, some 3.5, all without a single drop of formula ever, and bottles of expressed milk only used in the oldest. I've been looking for evidence that nutrition *after* birth could help improve facial structure, but I haven't seen anything but one anecdotal story so far. I don't know if there's any hope for the very weak facial structure all but the oldest have or not.


    I'm seeing fat little ones all over the place now. So, so sad.
    5'4" 36yo mother to five sweeties & married to their AMAZING DaddyGrok
    Starting: 185 lbs (March '10)
    Current: 132.5 lbs
    Goal: 135 lbs (Hit Jan '13)
    Beating bingeing since 10/31/11 on my Leptin Reset journey

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    57
    We noticed that while there were women of various levels of lean vs plump, NO WOMEN had a fat stomach or a muffin top - they were all gorgeously curved in at the waist, out at the hip - they had beautiful feminine figures, whatever their degree of plumpness.
    don't forget that practically every woman in those days wore foundational undergarments - girdles and such......

  10. #30
    Barb's Avatar
    Barb is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Seattle, WA USA
    Posts
    415
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Quote Originally Posted by primarilyprimal View Post
    don't forget that practically every woman in those days wore foundational undergarments - girdles and such......
    In the pictures I was referring to, the people were all wearing bathing suits - so no corsets, you could really see the shape of their figures.

Page 3 of 25 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •