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Thread: Cast iron frying pans now seasoned. Easy peasy! page

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    breadsauce's Avatar
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    Cast iron frying pans now seasoned. Easy peasy!

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    Well, I read all the info I could find about seasoning cast iron pans - all this baking in the oven with sesame oil etc - I reckoned that my ancestors in the 19th century wouldn't go through all of that.

    So - I scrubbed them with a Brillo pad (wire wool pad filled with soap) . Rinsed them really well and dried them thoroughly - over heat. Then I put a fairly good amount of pure Pork lard in the pans, heated and brushed the fat around the edges. I heated them to smoking point, kept them there for about 10 minutes, tipped the fat out and wiped with kitchen roll. I did this twice more; three times in total. The pans haven't gone black, but they feel good.

    Yesterday, I used the biggest pan to cook tinned salmon fish cakes, made with almond flour, chopped onion, dill weed and plenty of egg. I cooked them in lard. They were quite "sloppy" and so a GOOD TEST!!!

    The cast iron pan was the most non-stick pan I have ever used - fish cakes turned so easily with a spatula, they were just great. And tasted ace.....

    So - my advice with cast iron pans. Forget the oven. Forget ANY oil at all. Season them as Granny would have done - with pork fat. It is so easy - and it works a treat.

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    DeVaStAt0r's Avatar
    DeVaStAt0r is offline Junior Member
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    I love my cast iron skillet for all my meats. Especially steaks!

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    Some thing to keep in mind with cast iron, you have to keep seasoning them from time to time. I do mine maybe two to three times a year.

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    +1, I use mine all the time. I think using cast Iron is important, especially for women since using cast iron cookware actually imparts some iron into the diet which helps replenish the iron women lose during the normal menstrual cycle, as well as people with anemia. I also just never trusted the teflon stuff.

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    rayout's Avatar
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    Chemistry of Cast Iron Seasoning: A Science-Based How-To

    Seems like using an omega-3 fat is best. Keep in mind granny's lard would have been pastured. Flax seed oil seems to be the best if you don't have access to pastured fat.

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    L8F
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    In reference to above: Teflon is very bad for humans and animals. Look into it if you use teflon, I recall the fumes are quite dangerous. They now have some newer non-stick, non-toxic options for those of us who don't have cast iron. I use the scan pan, I *think* it is titanium. Awesome. I just wipe it out with a paper towel instead of washing. Love. But I might get cast iron for above good properties...

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    Cast iron is my favorite, and I cook almost everything on it. I don't need to re-season it because I don't use soap or harsh cleansers on it, but just scrub it out with hot water. You can pick up cast iron pretty cheap at yard sales and thrift stores but it's kinda hit or miss. I have to say my favorite skillet out of the three that I use was one I got at a thrift store. My least favorite is the one I bought new.

    The nice thing is, this is my first pregnancy that I have not had low blood iron levels and I attribute it to me cooking with cast iron so much now. I used to always have to take iron supplements but no more!

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    breadsauce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rayout View Post
    Chemistry of Cast Iron Seasoning: A Science-Based How-To

    Seems like using an omega-3 fat is best. Keep in mind granny's lard would have been pastured. Flax seed oil seems to be the best if you don't have access to pastured fat.
    No way will I use flax seed oil . My pork fat is from pastured (in the UK, read free range) pigs and they are fed no grain at all. And the pan, as I said - is now so non stick.

    When I seasoned them using oil they were sticky and no good. Granny would never have had access here in the UK to flax seed oil - so no to that. Granny was not Grok - but nearer to him by 3x generations than me - or is it 2 x generations??!!
    Last edited by breadsauce; 07-17-2011 at 12:15 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rayout View Post
    Chemistry of Cast Iron Seasoning: A Science-Based How-To

    Seems like using an omega-3 fat is best. Keep in mind granny's lard would have been pastured. Flax seed oil seems to be the best if you don't have access to pastured fat.
    Oh cool, thanks for that. I actually have to season the grates on my new gas cook top and was wondering what the best oil to use was. It doesn't matter if it's food grade oil as it's just the grates.

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    I have been using flax seed oil, putting the coated pans in a 475 degree oven. I put them in the cold oven, set it to 475, set the timer to 60 min. After 60 min, I turn the oven off and leave them in the oven with door closed for several hours until close to room temp. 3-4 coats later they are super glossy black, working great. In between seasonings, I wash with hot water only and rub a little coconut oil in after wash/dry.

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