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    croí's Avatar
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    Oh Deer!

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    I just started a new (2nd) job working as a server for a winery not too long ago. It sits on it's own vineard and is really a nice place! The owner is really nice, older man who came from a country East of Italy, I want to say Kosovo (but don't quote me on this). Last Saturday, he handed me a plate of deer sausage, and asked me to try. I loved it! He said there is a man who has a permit to hunt on his vineard to keep the deer, turkey, racoons, etc away from his grapes when they start to turn colors, and take on an odor. When he kills a deer, he calls it in, and take the deer to a local butcher. The butcher will cut up the meat any way he wants, and then this guy will sell the meat to Kreso (the owner). He asked me if I like deer meat, I said as a matter of fact..... So he gave me 4 different packages (cuttlings, stew meat, and roast) all from this last kill. He said when I'm done with that, he will give me some more. (Little does he know how fast this can this can be consumed eating Primal, but I won't push my luck! ) He said he'll also help me get in touch with the hunter, Austin, next time he kills a deer!!!!!! WOOT!!!!

    Now... how do I cook deer? Any special techniques?

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    It's a lean meat - so my only advice is to not over cook
    I curse you and your deer-eating goodness. While I'm stuck here drooling over the deer that pass by my fence all the time. lol

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    One of our favorite methods for the summer is to take the more tender cuts (assuming that would be your cuttlings?), and cut them 1/4-1/2 inch thin, stuff with green chilis, jalapenos, onions, or cream cheese....or a combo of those, season a bit, roll up and wrap with bacon. Place on skewers or use toothpicks, grill, yum.

    The roast and stew meat need to focus on low and slow cooking with moisture probably. You could turn the roast into jerky as well. I still use roasts for things like stir fry sometimes, I just slice thin and marinade before cooking, hit it with meat mallet a bit if you are worried (sometimes depends on the cut and the animal itself). You could toss the stew meat into a food processor with some beef fat (10%) or really fatty meat (25-30%), chop it up into a coarse grind, and wallah you have the fixins for a great venison burgers.

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    +1 on not overcooking it. Deer meat is fairly safe and can be eaten as rare as you like.

    You may want to be generous with the fat when cooking it also, as it has so little of its own.

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    *cough* illegal to sell wild game meat in the U.S. *cough* unethical.

    Sear, braise, stew, or ... Wrap in caul fat and roast.
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    Diana Renata's Avatar
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    Yes, it's "illegal" but like many butchers here they can ask you to pay their processing fee. The meat is technically free, but they should at least be paid for the work that they did to turn an animal into delicious sausage or steaks.

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    croí's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lily Marie View Post
    It's a lean meat - so my only advice is to not over cook
    I curse you and your deer-eating goodness. While I'm stuck here drooling over the deer that pass by my fence all the time. lol
    HAHAHA! This was all pure luck I tell you. I had no idea about this 'operation' until after Kreso offered the deer sausage to me.

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    croí's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diana Renata View Post
    Yes, it's "illegal" but like many butchers here they can ask you to pay their processing fee. The meat is technically free, but they should at least be paid for the work that they did to turn an animal into delicious sausage or steaks.
    Oh yes, this is all by the book. The butcher doesn't do it for free. When Austin kills the deer, he "calls it in" - I think is the processed. And then I think he does pay the butcher for his work.

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    croí's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meadow View Post
    One of our favorite methods for the summer is to take the more tender cuts (assuming that would be your cuttlings?), and cut them 1/4-1/2 inch thin, stuff with green chilis, jalapenos, onions, or cream cheese....or a combo of those, season a bit, roll up and wrap with bacon. Place on skewers or use toothpicks, grill, yum.

    The roast and stew meat need to focus on low and slow cooking with moisture probably. You could turn the roast into jerky as well. I still use roasts for things like stir fry sometimes, I just slice thin and marinade before cooking, hit it with meat mallet a bit if you are worried (sometimes depends on the cut and the animal itself). You could toss the stew meat into a food processor with some beef fat (10%) or really fatty meat (25-30%), chop it up into a coarse grind, and wallah you have the fixins for a great venison burgers.
    Both of these methods sound delicious. As I'm still new to cooking, could you pass on your wisdom of the recipe and instructions?

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