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Thread: 2handed kettlebell swings, wrists hurting. page

  1. #1
    MvEssen's Avatar
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    2handed kettlebell swings, wrists hurting.

    When I do 2handed kettlebell swings my wrists always start hurting real bad. I already limit the blow when going down to nearly zero but I feel the most pressure when pushing the kettlebell up again. The wrists hurting always limits my numbers, I could do twice as much swings with ease if it wasn't for the wrists. I also don't think it's really good for them to get so much pressure.

    Any tips on how to prevent this from happening, or maybe to strengthen my wrists? When doing MMA I found out my wrists where always extremely flexible and quite strong, which was really helpfull with some moves. So I find this weird.

  2. #2
    John Belkewitch's Avatar
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    Considering I know nothing of your KB experience, the first thing I would ask is if you feel comfortable with your Swing technique? Are you hinging from the hips and powering through with your glutes, or do you find that you're "pulling" with your upper architecture? Does the head of the KB flip-flop in the air when swinging?

    Aside on checking in on your technique, you'll want to make sure your prepping for your Swing session with a bit of mobility and dynamic flexibility, both for your hips and wrists if you find that's where you're prone to discomfort.

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    primalclubber's Avatar
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    If you're doing swings correctly, you shouldn't be feeling any pressure on your wrist, arms, or shoulders. Sounds like you're trying to "lift" the bell on the upswing, which might be what's causing pressure on your wrist joint. Try to find an RKC or HKC certified trainer to take a look at your technique.

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    Lawbat's Avatar
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    My guess is also that the move needs to be more hip and less arm. That said, I've recently hurt my rotator cuff doing kettlebells. Was just beginning to not bang my forearms, and then one day, guess I snatched wrong. Going to take weeks to repair. Honestly think I've been turned off from the kbells at this point. Those things are more about learning the right form and the right torque then about growing stronger, no? Had been so in love with the fun of the new exercise and the coolness of it all.... but now I'm thinking regular old dumbells maybe have, ironically, been smarter.

    Someone convince me otherwise? Any kettlebell recovery tips would be appreciated as well!

  5. #5
    MvEssen's Avatar
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    Seems you guys are right, more hip and less arm seems to put no pressure on my wrists.
    I knew it was a lot of hip, but not that it was all hip :P. Thnx!

  6. #6
    primalclubber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lawbat View Post
    My guess is also that the move needs to be more hip and less arm. That said, I've recently hurt my rotator cuff doing kettlebells. Was just beginning to not bang my forearms, and then one day, guess I snatched wrong. Going to take weeks to repair. Honestly think I've been turned off from the kbells at this point. Those things are more about learning the right form and the right torque then about growing stronger, no? Had been so in love with the fun of the new exercise and the coolness of it all.... but now I'm thinking regular old dumbells maybe have, ironically, been smarter.

    Someone convince me otherwise? Any kettlebell recovery tips would be appreciated as well!
    The largest kb's I have are 24 kgs and 80% of my training is with my 16 kg. That said I walked into the gym on Friday on a whim (for the first time this year) and proceeded to progressively deadlift to 305 lbs for 3 reps and finished with 3x5 cleans and presses at 135 and 145 lbs. No straps no belt. I'm 51, 165 lbs and work out only with KBs, some clubs and mace, and bodyweight. I've been to the gym maybe 5 times in the last 3 years but was a gym rat for the past 10+. I hurt my shoulder my one and only time doing snatches for the very first time 4 years ago, and it took 6 mos to fully recover. Haven't been hurt in 3 years since with the bells. Yes it's very technical and yes you can get hurt if you don't know what your doing. Anything technical and dynamic is. If that's your worry just stick to dumb bells on the preacher bench, or do machines. If you get hurt, it's user error, don't blame the tool.

    Actually, going back to the gym was a bit of a shock to me. 3 years ago free weights had about 20% of the square footage. When I walked in it Friday it took me 5 min to find the free weight area which is now maybe 5%.

    I did 400 snatches yesterday with my 16 kg in 25 min. The day before deadlift day I did 1000 swing session with my 24 kg in about 45 min, but have done it for time in under 35 mins. I'm feeling great today. I might even go tear the new phone book in half the guy just dropped off today just for the heck of it. I love working the bells, I love working out outside on my porch. I could care less what you decide, but don't blame the tool for user error.

  7. #7
    Andtckrtoo's Avatar
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    My first thought was why would you be pushing the kettlebell UP with your hands. You can use your arms to push it down, but the hip pushes it up. If you want an excellent tutorial on doing swings - watch this: Kettlebell Swing Video

    And I agree with PrimalClubber - kettlebells are wonderful. Yes proper technique is critical, but then again it is any time you are lifting heavy weights. Even a bicep curl can hurt you if done wrong. I did a tabata of swings and high pulls today that had me dripping and my HR equal to a good run.

    Also, once you think you have form down - try a heavier bell for swings. If you swing with too light a bell, it's too easy to cheat with your arms. You cannot do that with a heavier bell.

    I'm a girl and I snatch with a 10kg, and swing a 16kg. I'm considering a heavier kettlebell for swings.
    Last edited by Andtckrtoo; 07-11-2011 at 06:18 PM.
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  8. #8
    Lawbat's Avatar
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    I guess I 'm rethinking the whole dynamic exercise thing.
    Loved the kettlebells until the injury. Loved them. I wanted to go out and buy a mini kettlebell for my desk at work.
    Pretty much just bitterly stewing while recovering. Never really injured before.

    The whole dynamic idea vs. free weights/machines... better because?
    I mean, it felt better. I WANT to be able to justify it. But in the weeks doing the bells I think I see less definition and raw strength increase.

    Dynamic vs... "static?"

    Anyone got anything to convince by cranky recovering inner grok not to give up on the bells?

  9. #9
    JeffC's Avatar
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    Lawbat, I don't have a lot to offer beyond what others have said. Everybody probably gets hurt at some time so don't fret it, let it be a learning experience. A few months after starting with KBs, I pulled a serratus muscle where the ribs contact to a muscle, fortunately it healed fast. Actually you could do that from a heavy sneeze or any type of odd movement but it happened while doing KB swings.

    You must start slow and be careful with KBs in a way that is not so true with machines. It is always better to end things early rather than pushing and letting your form deteriorate. The programming and instruction you get is as important as the KB itself. I would invest in the "Enter the Kettlebell" book and DVD or else look into Valery Fedorenko's style of lifting, he has a program you can buy from his web page, it's just a different lifting philosophy from the previous book, both are good, just different. This is one area of exercise, where winging it does not fly in my book.

    If you are looking for a cheap alternative with fewer hazards, I would recommend sandbags, especially ones with filler bags so you can vary the weight. You can get much of the same aerobic benefit from shouldering or snatching a bag, it is much less technique oriented, and if you drop it on your foot or the floor, nothing is likely to get injured.

  10. #10
    Lawbat's Avatar
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    sandbags sound cool
    i'll check it out
    thanks!

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