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Thread: The Ballad of a Barefoot Heel Striker page 2

  1. #11
    Catherine's Avatar
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    i don't see how in the world you can heel strike in vibrams. good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catherine View Post
    i don't see how in the world you can heel strike in vibrams. good luck.
    I can see how. I wear VFF sprints a fair amount and I still heel-strike when walking. I find running sprints I'm okay but I'm still bad when walking and jogging.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catherine View Post
    i don't see how in the world you can heel strike in vibrams. good luck.
    It's easy. They've got a lot of cushion. Go barefoot for six months and then put them back on. You'll be amazed. Mine feel like hiking boots now.

    If I had a dollar for every person I've seen running badly in Vibrams, I'd be rich. They just block too much feedback from your feet.

    Gordo

  4. #14
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    no chance i'll be going barefoot running anytime! VFFs feel like zero cushion to me. I've never had any heel strike issues b/c i've always kinda run on my forefoot/balls of my feet. At the fleet feet store, they said i had "neutral" gait. I think i heel strike when walking, isn't that normal?

    i saw a girl out on our jogging path once, wearing bikilas, and heel striking like a mofo. It was absolutely painful to watch. I couldn't see how she was actually doing that to herself, it looked so painful.

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    Practice by standing still. Lift one leg up, then the other ... do this with increasing rapidity on the spot.
    Push into some forward motion. Now you're running forwards and not heel striking ... and looking like a total berk!

    Refine form while retaining the principle.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Griffin View Post
    I can see how. I wear VFF sprints a fair amount and I still heel-strike when walking. I find running sprints I'm okay but I'm still bad when walking and jogging.
    Without getting too far off topic: when walking, heel striking is fine and totally appropriate. When jogging and running you should want to be on your mid-foot. For sprinting: if you're heel striking you're not really sprinting and vice versa, that to me is a physical impossibility, if you're truly sprinting there's no way your heel is touching the ground first (if at all, during a sprint!)

    Re: walking. If somebody shows me good footage of mid-foot walkers I might change my tune. Heel striking is very natural when walking and doesn't have nearly the amount of pressure or force that happens when one is jogging. I know a few people that don't heel strike but they also have some other issues in their legs. One of my friends has locked knees I think, and another girl walks almost literally on the balls of her feet but I forgot her reason why.

    I don't see a need to alter the way you walk. I know some put babies as an example but I think it's only fair to use a baby/toddler that has gotten their balance down and walks without too much wobble and observe whether they strike heel-first or what. If you have to think about it too much, it's not natural.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catherine View Post
    VFFs feel like zero cushion to me.
    Yeah, when I got mine almost four years ago, I thought "I'm freaking BAREFOOT!". I stopped wearing them for running after I discovered that they changed my running form for the worse. I did this by switching back and forth between barefoot and the Sprints a few times during the same run and paying close attention to what changed. I decided on the spot to go full monty until I got running dialed. By the time I did, I couldn't stand the Vibrams any more. Now I wear Luna sandals if it's too rough for bare feet.

    Gordo

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    Quote Originally Posted by gordo View Post
    It's easy. They've got a lot of cushion. Go barefoot for six months and then put them back on. You'll be amazed. Mine feel like hiking boots now.

    If I had a dollar for every person I've seen running badly in Vibrams, I'd be rich. They just block too much feedback from your feet.
    This is what I've slowly come to realize as well. I was very excited about my VFFs last year (when I started "barefoot" running), but I've since decided they aren't the best way to safely learn proper form. They seem like a barefoot experience if you're transitioning from the standard super-cushioned running shoe but they're really not. If you have a tendency to heel strike, then -- unless you remain very mindful of your form during your entire run -- you will probably end up heel striking in your VFFs. And even if you don't end up heel striking in them, you probably still won't run with optimal form (it'll be some sort of in-between heel strike and optimal form blend -- if you follow me). And because the VFFs offer very little protection, you may be more likely to hurt yourself doing small things wrong.

    If you really want to learn how to run right, ditch all footwear. Practice on a variety of surfaces, and run at different speeds (from slow jogs to all out sprints). Pay attention to what your body does naturally. Feel what it's like to run with naturally good form and remember that feeling -- internalize it. With practice, proper form will become habit.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by iniQuity View Post
    Without getting too far off topic: when walking, heel striking is fine and totally appropriate. When jogging and running you should want to be on your mid-foot. For sprinting: if you're heel striking you're not really sprinting and vice versa, that to me is a physical impossibility, if you're truly sprinting there's no way your heel is touching the ground first (if at all, during a sprint!)

    Re: walking. If somebody shows me good footage of mid-foot walkers I might change my tune. Heel striking is very natural when walking and doesn't have nearly the amount of pressure or force that happens when one is jogging. I know a few people that don't heel strike but they also have some other issues in their legs. One of my friends has locked knees I think, and another girl walks almost literally on the balls of her feet but I forgot her reason why.

    I don't see a need to alter the way you walk. I know some put babies as an example but I think it's only fair to use a baby/toddler that has gotten their balance down and walks without too much wobble and observe whether they strike heel-first or what. If you have to think about it too much, it's not natural.
    I always laugh when I hear someone saying it's ok to heel strike while walking barefoot.

    That's all fine and dandy until you get a bottlecap or shard of glass or nail embedded into your foot. Anyone who has walked barefoot consistently for years walks with a mid foot strike. You have to, or else you WILL end up with things in your feet.

    Heel strike is NEVER natural. People walk that way now, because they've been conditioned from birth to wear shoes. Spend a few years not wearing shoes, and the hell strike goes away. Does it look funny to walk with a midfoot strike? Perhaps, but it is natural, and it only looks silly because people aren't used to seeing it.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteVick View Post
    I always laugh when I hear someone saying it's ok to heel strike while walking barefoot.

    That's all fine and dandy until you get a bottlecap or shard of glass or nail embedded into your foot. Anyone who has walked barefoot consistently for years walks with a mid foot strike. You have to, or else you WILL end up with things in your feet.

    Heel strike is NEVER natural. People walk that way now, because they've been conditioned from birth to wear shoes. Spend a few years not wearing shoes, and the hell strike goes away. Does it look funny to walk with a midfoot strike? Perhaps, but it is natural, and it only looks silly because people aren't used to seeing it.
    What you call midfoot, I might call a heel strike. It's kind of a whole heel landing, rather than landing on the back corner of the heel the way you do in shoes. And it's more under the body than the classic heel strike. I've been walking barefoot that way for years and haven't gotten anything in my feet. And yes, I walk through broken glass all the time. I mostly avoid stepping right on it, but I do land on it sometimes.

    Gordo

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