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Thread: Converting kids to PB - eliminate wheat first? page

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    Betho's Avatar
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    Converting kids to PB - eliminate wheat first?

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    I'm sort of mulling over how I'm going to get my kids switched over to a more primal way of eating and I definitely need to take it in baby steps. One kid I think will take pretty readily to it but the other I know is a carb/grain/sugar fiend and she'll be a little more tricky. So, I think to eliminate one thing at a time would work best, but I'm not sure where to go on that. Is wheat the biggest culprit? We have a lot of habits that need to be changed before we can go primal completely as a family (I'm still learning it myself, this is only my third week in), but I think wheat could be a decent first step and would be a lot easier eliminated in one step as opposed to sugar which I think will need to be done over a little longer period of time.

    Am I correct in thinking this?

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    I think wheat, sugar, and all processed boxed foods should be the first to go. If you need to break that up in steps then that is o.k but all of those things need to go first. After you have removed those bad foods from the diet then I would work on cutting out other grains and also dairy that is not organic and full-fat.

    At the same time that you are removing foods you can try to add some new foods that will take the place of the bad foods. My 3 year old daughter really loves eggs, kale chips, organic full-fat fermented dairy products, nuts/seeds, and most organic grassfed meats
    Jaime, wife to Phaedrus and primal mama to A (4) and X (1).

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    belinda's Avatar
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    I've greatly cut down on my daughter's waffle consumption by giving her a scrambled egg and a slice or two of bacon first

    My goal now is to switch her over gradually to more primal carbs and fats as she needs to put on some weight.
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    I think that if you could pull processed sugars, you would be doing a WONDERFUL job. Just eating foods with *NO* added sugars would be a home run.

    Eliminating grains might be tough... Even assuming that you could supply emough carbs from other sources.

    If your kids are eating something like crackers made from whole wheat and soybean oil (gasp), and ham and cheese sandwhiches on whole wheat bread, and strawberries and bannas, and milk, while his freinds are eating cookies and candy and fast food, and sodas, you are setting a really good foundation.

    If the kids can handle that transition (or are already there), then I'd consider substituting some wheat products.

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    Betho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waskydiver View Post
    I think that if you could pull processed sugars, you would be doing a WONDERFUL job. Just eating foods with *NO* added sugars would be a home run.

    Eliminating grains might be tough... Even assuming that you could supply emough carbs from other sources.

    If your kids are eating something like crackers made from whole wheat and soybean oil (gasp), and ham and cheese sandwhiches on whole wheat bread, and strawberries and bannas, and milk, while his freinds are eating cookies and candy and fast food, and sodas, you are setting a really good foundation.

    If the kids can handle that transition (or are already there), then I'd consider substituting some wheat products.
    This is actually pretty much where we have been forever. Before I went primal, I kept us to a pretty high CW standard - baking my own bread, we have chickens for fresh eggs, no cookies/candy/fast food except occasional treats, and since I'm allergic to soy protein we haven't had frozen or boxed convenience food in the house in years. We don't eat much refined sugar, I don't buy "treats" just because of my own willpower problems so by default it's unusual for them to have any foods overtly sugary. But you know how sugar seems to be snuck into pretty much EVERYTHING.

    For instance, breakfast is usually cold cereal (non "sugar cereal" but usually Corn Chex, Cheerios or something like that) or homemade pancakes or muffins if I feel ambitious. I used to make granola but haven't made any since I went primal. Lunch is usually PBJ with homemade jam and homemade bread, or a quesadilla with fruit. Dinners are always homecooked, so no frozen foods there. No sodas or anything here either, just milk, juice and water. I think refined sugar will be the toughest to eliminate not because they are so used to large quantities of it, but just the opposite - I'm at the point where I'd have to start going through condiments and whatnot to find the sources of sugar in their diet... just the little stuff.

    I do think eliminating grains will be the toughest, but eliminating ONE grain might not be tough to start off with, and I think wheat might be the best option since that would essentially eliminate most gluten.

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    Mike Gager's Avatar
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    you should probably get your kids on board with the change long before it actually happens.

    i have known of plenty of kids who have those "crazy" parents who wont let them eat sugar or whatever and it is always a big failure. the kids will find a way to eat what they want.

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    zandy's Avatar
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    My husband and I have been doing PB for about 2 months. We have a 12 y.o. and an 8 y.o., and my intention initially didn't involve get them on PB, but it's ended up that way by default. I make primal meals and they eat them. I recently purged the house of all non-PB foods, with a few exceptions (haven't made it to the condiments yet, etc). The main CW area that remains is cold cereal; they love the stuff. I've only ever bought "healthy" types of cereal, and have now switched to buying only gluten-free ones. I figure it's a step in the right direction. They still eat whatever they want when they're at their friends' houses, they order pizza, etc at restaurants, but what I serve at home for lunch and dinner is PB. I'm figuring that's as good as it's going to get for now.

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    You definitely want to talk them through it before you make the switch.

    But then yes, processed foods and grains should be the first to go. At the same time I would keep plenty of natural whole snacks around. Fruit, macadamia nuts, etc.

    I would also make meal time something of a joint effort if you can (be there and enlist their help in preparing meals) and be as kid-friendly as possible. Make stuff they recognize that isn't weird.

    By not weird I mean, marinated chicken with salad is not weird. Eating a hamburger without the bun might be weird off the top (but a fun weekend adventure later).

    *shrUg*

    Kids are going to burn energy faster and more efficiently than adults. Don't fear fruit.

    And for my money one of the best services you can do them is to not focus on frankenPRIMAL (almond meal cookies and the like) but get them to dig real wholesome primal fare in its natural forms without a whole lot of backflippery.

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    Thanks guys My kids are 2 and 4 so consulting them beforehand about a diet change is not really going to be a productive conversation. I mainly want to do as Zandy is - I'm not going to be militant about it, and I will even let them have occasional treats like smores when we're camping, etc. but I want to have their 80% be primal.

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    My kids are around your kids ages, I have a 7, 4 and 2 year old and they have been 80/20 for awhile. It's not as hard as you'd think at this age and like you, I didn't discuss it with them before hand. I just stopped buying the stuff I didn't want them to have. Like you too, they weren't eating a lot of processed foods and not much sugar at all, so those weren't hard to cut completely. It was the grains in the form of whole wheat bread, pastas and the like that were the biggest change for them to notice. But I went cold turkey with them and was pleasantly surprised at how little protest they put up. I did as others suggest and made sure there were lots of alternatives for them so they have something that they like available, that of course made the old habits easier to break. We have always done a lot of baking in our house though, so I do have a good amount of frankenprimal (had to laugh at that one!) around but since they always bake with me it was easy to talk about why we use almond flour now and not whole wheat or pastry flour, etc. It was a natural switch since that was a part of their lives already. If we didn't bake regularly then I wouldn't have introduced those items as a way to make them primal though. My kids did up their fruit intake a lot with this change, and we never limit their fruit intake. We try to have fresh fruit on hand at all times, nothing canned unless I've canned it and it's the winter months. And when we eat out, we do allow them to choose from whatever is on the menu or available, we don't stress about those times since at home they are eating much better than they were before.

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