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    wildwabbit's Avatar
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    Sausages better for you than we originally thought?

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    So, I recall that lots of stuff ends up in sausages, we were told some things are best not seen being made and sausages are one of them (politics being the other). Presumably this is because odd parts of the animals ended up in sausage. Now, were these things really offal type things that we now know are good for us? Does this mean, that sausages are much more nutritious than we would have expected since maybe the extra stuff in sausage is really more primal?

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    In traditional sausage making, yes, I would say so. Commercial sausages in this era of preservatives, meat glue, and pink slime, not so much.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    In traditional sausage making, yes, I would say so. Commercial sausages in this era of preservatives, meat glue, and pink slime, not so much.
    I say no to commercial sausages. It's a shame they need all these additives/preservatives.

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    Say yes to real sausages. (Whole Foods makes decent ones.)

    I make sausages from time to time, always out of backfat, or pork belly for extra fat, and then pork butt for the meat. Use good pork, and a sausage is no worse for you than say... pork shoulder.

    Want a bratwurst? Use a small grinder die, and beat cream and a few egg yolks in with your spices. Cake walk.

    Want merguez? Spices and wine, and orange peels.

    I opted out of ground mystery meats from the market about 3 years ago, bought a hand grinder, and then sprung for the grinder attachment to my mixer. Best choice I could have made, aside from the one where I threw out the microwave. (BTW, pink salt isn't bad in the proper amounts. I could get the same effect on meat from a few pounds of spinach, but I'd prefer the normal curing salt, because it isn't going to kill.)
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    Read the label. US sausage is frequently a Frankenfood. Traditional sausage in other countries may contain grains, etc. (due to the history of food in the US, US sausage tends to be 100% meat products).
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    I had some sausages made (after some very clear conversation with the butcher about what celiac disease means) when I bought my cow a couple of months ago. I also buy sausages sometimes from the pig farmer I deal with at the farmers market--he's become a friend over the last year, and he makes wonderful, gluten-free, traditional British-style sausages. I'll also buy chorizo from another trustworthy farmer (who is also celiac and gets it).

    You can also very quickly and easily throw together sausage patties for yourself using good quality ground meat, and it wouldn't be too hard to add whatever offal you liked to that.

    In my experience, a lot of US and Canadian sausage meat products still have grain-based fillers or binders, although they may be what I call "stealth gluten", which is harder to identify unless you know what to look for on a food label.
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    Quote Originally Posted by davem View Post
    Say yes to real sausages. (Whole Foods makes decent ones.)

    I make sausages from time to time, always out of backfat, or pork belly for extra fat, and then pork butt for the meat. Use good pork, and a sausage is no worse for you than say... pork shoulder.

    Want a bratwurst? Use a small grinder die, and beat cream and a few egg yolks in with your spices. Cake walk.

    Want merguez? Spices and wine, and orange peels.

    I opted out of ground mystery meats from the market about 3 years ago, bought a hand grinder, and then sprung for the grinder attachment to my mixer. Best choice I could have made, aside from the one where I threw out the microwave. (BTW, pink salt isn't bad in the proper amounts. I could get the same effect on meat from a few pounds of spinach, but I'd prefer the normal curing salt, because it isn't going to kill.)
    How much did the hand grinder run you? I'm curious. I think I saw a price, or two some time ago, and grinders were really expensive

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    Mine was straight from Poland, real old world weight to it. I got it at a german market for $50 I think. The attachment for my kitchen aid was the same.

    So, something that's really confusing me here, is why would anyone need to tell their butcher anything about celiac, or tell them not to put wheat in your sausage. There is no wheat in sausage, and if you have to tell your butcher that, they're in the wrong business. ALL SAUSAGE IS GRAIN FREE UNLESS IT IS MADE WRONG.

    Seriously, sausage is some of the easiest stuff to make - rough cuts of meat, ground. Spices. Liquid. I guess one could but oats in one, but that would be well... disgusting in both texture and insipid flavor. Technically you *could* use soy sauce, but... why?

    The method is cakewalk too, grind semi frozen meat, keep it cold, add spices and liquid, beat the hell out of it until it gels together, but keep the temp sub 40F or so, and then stuff it. Five minutes from grind to stuffing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by davem View Post
    Mine was straight from Poland, real old world weight to it. I got it at a german market for $50 I think. The attachment for my kitchen aid was the same.

    So, something that's really confusing me here, is why would anyone need to tell their butcher anything about celiac, or tell them not to put wheat in your sausage. There is no wheat in sausage, and if you have to tell your butcher that, they're in the wrong business. ALL SAUSAGE IS GRAIN FREE UNLESS IT IS MADE WRONG.

    Seriously, sausage is some of the easiest stuff to make - rough cuts of meat, ground. Spices. Liquid. I guess one could but oats in one, but that would be well... disgusting in both texture and insipid flavor. Technically you *could* use soy sauce, but... why?

    The method is cakewalk too, grind semi frozen meat, keep it cold, add spices and liquid, beat the hell out of it until it gels together, but keep the temp sub 40F or so, and then stuff it. Five minutes from grind to stuffing.
    I suppose, the amount of sodium won't be as bad as commercial, either; is this right? That's one of the hang ups as far as sausage goes - even when dealing with better made ones in contrast to "big names."

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    Quote Originally Posted by davem View Post
    Mine was straight from Poland, real old world weight to it. I got it at a german market for $50 I think. The attachment for my kitchen aid was the same.

    So, something that's really confusing me here, is why would anyone need to tell their butcher anything about celiac, or tell them not to put wheat in your sausage. There is no wheat in sausage, and if you have to tell your butcher that, they're in the wrong business. ALL SAUSAGE IS GRAIN FREE UNLESS IT IS MADE WRONG.

    Seriously, sausage is some of the easiest stuff to make - rough cuts of meat, ground. Spices. Liquid. I guess one could but oats in one, but that would be well... disgusting in both texture and insipid flavor. Technically you *could* use soy sauce, but... why?

    The method is cakewalk too, grind semi frozen meat, keep it cold, add spices and liquid, beat the hell out of it until it gels together, but keep the temp sub 40F or so, and then stuff it. Five minutes from grind to stuffing.
    I think some of the spice mixes sometimes end up with wheat products in them. If it is a higher volume meat shop they might just be ordering the spice mixes from a supplier. As loafingcactus mentioned, certain styles of ethnic or cultural sausages have grains in them. Quite common in certain parts of Europe at least.

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