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Thread: Bone Broth . . . again! page

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    Rosemary 231's Avatar
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    Bone Broth . . . again!

    In another thread I asked a lot of questions about making bone broth and the benefits of drinking it. I've made it twice now, learned what added vegetables make it better and what's better left out. First my question. How long is it necessary to simmer the bones and liquid to get a healthy broth? The two times I made it I cooked it around 24 hours. It was a nice dense color and tasted delicious. However, after cooking it for the first 12 hours, I use about a 6 qt. crockpot, the smell of "someone cooking a wonderful roast beef dinner" starts to get to be a bit much . . . even for me. We live in the desert and using a burner on the stove and a soup pot for 24 hours just isn't practical. Putting the crockpot outside in not an option. Its supposed to be 111 today and the cost of air conditioning in our city is unbelievable. We make every effort not to heat the house up. The rest of the family is made up of 2 carb maniacs and one convential wisdom type. They are all respectful of my "Primal ways" and try to be helpful. I don't want to push their patience too much. At best I get about 6 or 7 cups of broth out of a crockpot full of bones and water. Last week I got only 3 but I had the pot so full of soup bones there wasn't much room for water. Speaking of bones, the grocery store I usually shop at sells knuckle bones for over $2.00 a lb. and soup bones with some bits of meat attached for about $1.99. I do save bones from steaks when we have them. I know independent butchers might be able to do better costwise but I'm just getting out of the wheelchair and driving again and I still need a little help getting around and trying not to be a pain. I need some suggestions on how this might be carried out more effeciently and odor free.
    Last edited by Rosemary 231; 07-01-2011 at 02:28 PM.

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    IvyBlue's Avatar
    IvyBlue is offline Senior Member
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    Why does the outdoor temperature preclude placing it outside? Are you worried about critters?
    Wheat is the new tobacco. Spread the word.

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    Rosemary 231's Avatar
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    Critters can be a problem. My daughter thinks that when the temp drops at night it will affect the temp of the crockpot. The first time I made the broth it was in front of an open kitchen window (not too hot yet to have the window open at night) she said the temp dropped quite a bit. There was however, a fan placed in front of it to blow the smell out. I think the best solution IS to place it outside overnight.

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    IvyBlue's Avatar
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    Your local forecast calls for a chilly 83 degrees tonight, nothing to worry about, stick it outside.
    Wheat is the new tobacco. Spread the word.

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    Rosemary 231's Avatar
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    I use the Weather Chanel online. I just checked too and it made 111. It's better for me not to know. I can imagine sweat dripping off the book shelves.

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    Care to share which veggies you've found work better than others? I typically do just bones and if I add vegetables I add them only for an hour on stovetop or else I think the broth is too sweet.

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    JeffC's Avatar
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    I would add only enough bones that you can get about 10 cups of broth out of it. If you let it sit in the crockpot for 48 hours I have found that it gets so strong that I can dilute it with about equal parts water and it still tastes great. Thus, I will make the broth, freeze it in 2 cup containers but then when I use a 2 cup container days or weeks later I add equal parts water. Although it takes 48 hours to do (and you'll have to tolerate the aroma) you'll make if less frequently and it will last longer because you can dilute it. Just something to consider.

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    Rosemary 231's Avatar
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    First time I sliced an onion, added 3 garlic cloves, chopped 2 celery stalks and 1 carrot. It seemed almost too sweet. My daughter says it was the carrot but she's had carrot issues since she was in a highchair. It wasn't pretty! Next time I just put in the sliced onion, 1/2 a very large one and the 3 garlic cloves. Also . . . I had just finished cooking a chuck roast in the crockpot so I just left all the drippings and juices in the pot put in the bones, onion and garlic and topped it off with water. I did have to skim about 3/4 of an inch of fat off the top after it had been in the fridge overnight but it was very nice and gelatin-y.

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    Rosemary 231's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffC View Post
    I would add only enough bones that you can get about 10 cups of broth out of it. If you let it sit in the crockpot for 48 hours I have found that it gets so strong that I can dilute it with about equal parts water and it still tastes great. Thus, I will make the broth, freeze it in 2 cup containers but then when I use a 2 cup container days or weeks later I add equal parts water. Although it takes 48 hours to do (and you'll have to tolerate the aroma) you'll make if less frequently and it will last longer because you can dilute it. Just something to consider.
    This second batch I did dilute with water. It was a bit too strong. I would really love to make this ahead, freeze it and cart a few days worth off to school with me. The other 3 in the family are so tolerant of my Primal eating that I don't want to push my luck. I've found that just living the life quietly gets me a whole lot more cooperation. They've noticed my weight loss - 33 lbs. and they discovered that my primal meals can be blended into family meals very simply by just adding a starch.

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    HillsideGina's Avatar
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    Maangchi has a recipe with step-by-step photos of the traditional Korean bone broth:

    Ox-bone soup / 설렁탕 / Seolleongtang

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