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    Sanctus Real's Avatar
    Sanctus Real is offline Senior Member
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    Reps?

    Okay, I'm a typical chick, probably totally over-thinking things, but that is my way. I've been doing my progressions for push-ups, and I'm currently doing the elevated ones, the step that precedes a straight-up push-up. I may have the name wrong.

    I'm not able to do more than 10 push-ups with proper form. I can rest a minute, then do another 10 or so with half-assed form. The question is whether this is helping me. Should I just do as many as I can with good form, and stop when I'm unable to execute a perfect push-up, or will it help me to do half-assed reps until I can do nothing? I'm not sure which will be better for me, to help me progress.

    The PBF says when I can do 25 perfect incline PUs, I can progress to regular ones. Which method will help me to get to regular ones more quickly?
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    lssanjose's Avatar
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    I'm being a firm believer in this, now: frequency over repetition. It'd be more beneficial to practice perfect push ups every day, as opposed to as many push ups you can in one sitting. I think this worked out for me when I tried doing a pull up when I was a teenager. My dad had just bought the bar, and we'd just jump on it at first. Over time, it became easier to do it because I got so used to the movements by repeating the right ones, as frequently as I can. But, that's just me.

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    twa2w's Avatar
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    Look up 'greasing the grove :-)
    Rahter than do 10, do 5 at every opportunity you can through out the day - or ven fewer if you can only squeeze one or two in. Pretty soon it will be easy to do many more.
    Or pick a spot in your house and everytime you go past that spot do one or two perfect pushups. In a day you will do many more than 25. Then you can start stringing them together.

    Cheers
    J

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    Josse,

    Pushups every day may get her "rep" up, but it's not exactly primal...

    I'd say- yes, it's ok for your form to suffer some-- as long as you are following interval training and going as hard as you can for a certain amount of time.

    And if push-ups are not your thing, there are plenty of other exercises that are fun and will help the same muscles.

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    lssanjose's Avatar
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    It's not being chronic, really, astronmr20. Based on what's she's saying, her fibers are already shot by the fifth rep. I operate by these terms: Precision, Speed, then Stress. Repetition makes habit, but perfect repetition, makes perfect. These push ups could be seen as her moving frequently at a slow pace. The key is to exhaust your fibers, but not go at it like chronic HIT training. Based on what's she's saying, she's barely getting into the swing of things push ups-wise. If she can do five push ups with good form, then I'd stick with that. But, I think upping the intensity would help. In some cases, while upper body is being rested, she could do some squats, then go back to push ups. Key being, exhausting your fibers beyond repair, but then allowing adequate time for rest so they can get back up again.

    Oh yeah, don't forget to breathe properly. Remember, precision, speed, then stress

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    Sanctus Real's Avatar
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    I've heard of greasing the groove, just didn't think about applying the principle here, for whatever reason. My living room coffee table is about the height of the bench I've been using at the gym, though I'd probably exhaust myself if I did five every time I passed. (I have to pass it to go to the kids' rooms, which is about 100 times a day.) That being said, I can try to do 5 every hour.

    Might work, and I'd be using perfect form, too! Thanks for the advice!
    Last edited by Sanctus Real; 06-24-2011 at 09:45 PM.
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  7. #7
    astronmr20's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lssanjose View Post
    It's not being chronic, really, astronmr20. Based on what's she's saying, her fibers are already shot by the fifth rep. I operate by these terms: Precision, Speed, then Stress. Repetition makes habit, but perfect repetition, makes perfect. These push ups could be seen as her moving frequently at a slow pace. The key is to exhaust your fibers, but not go at it like chronic HIT training. Based on what's she's saying, she's barely getting into the swing of things push ups-wise. If she can do five push ups with good form, then I'd stick with that. But, I think upping the intensity would help. In some cases, while upper body is being rested, she could do some squats, then go back to push ups. Key being, exhausting your fibers beyond repair, but then allowing adequate time for rest so they can get back up again.

    Oh yeah, don't forget to breathe properly. Remember, precision, speed, then stress

    I see.

    In that case, I could use the same method to get me past the pull-up count I've been stuck at for ages (only 7 at a time).

    So I knock out 2 or 3 each time I see the bar, throughout the day?

  8. #8
    lssanjose's Avatar
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    By that principle, yes. I don't know how long it took me to do more than one, but I operated under that premise for at least a year. By the time I hit eighth, or ninth grade, I could do nine, or ten. This was 15 years ago though. I kind of did the same thing when I got my iron gym, too. Just did enough to the point I couldn't do any more properly.

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