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Thread: Born to Run by Christopher McDougall page

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    Marie's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel


    Finished this book last night and loved it...great storytelling, inspirational, fun characters, a peek into the Tarahumara tribe... anybody else out there read it? I am a runner and always will be, so it's not hard for me to accept the premise that humans are meant to run long distances.


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    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    A quick forum search shows this has been a recent topic.


    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/search.php?q=%22born+to+run%22&x=0&y=0


    PS, you weren't.


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    Geoff's Avatar
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    Hi Marie -


    I've been a distance runner for almost 25 years. Read "Born to Run" and loved it. You can see my thoughts on it here (it was a long post - otherwise I'd have reproduced it here).

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...-reading/page2


    Glad you found it enjoyable too.

  4. #4
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    Thank you both... I'll check those links in a little while after I get dinner in the oven.


    OTB, I DID type in "christopher mcdougall" and "born to run" in the search box, but got no results...and if the topic has been around this past month, I haven't been...so...anyway... thanks for posting the link.


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    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    Sure, Marie. The search function here is, um, erratic? I did the Mcdougall first, using your spelling, nada. Then "BTR" and got the links I posted.


    Yes, a heated topic!


    (Notice that Pheidippides did not offer to run back to the battle site. He couldn't, of course.......)


  6. #6
    Geoff's Avatar
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    OtB - I think you're being a little hard on poor old Pheidippides. Remember, before the battle he had run cross-country from Athens to Sparta and back (call it 150 miles) in just 2 days. If he'd only followed the old hard day/easy day principle... (Oh, wait a minute, the "victory lap" from Marathon to Athens WAS his easy day!)


    Kidding aside (or perhaps not), Frank Shorter was once reported to have lamented to another marathoner as they passed the 20 mile mark - "Why couldn't Pheidippides have just dropped dead right here?"


  7. #7
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    'kay, read all the posts on both a good case for persistance hunting (remember, as with the Tarahumara, the whole tribe may have been in on the hunt... with the women and kiddos straggling in at the end... so there would not have been a need for hauling that heavy kill home. He also pointed out the different anatomical features that we have that are necessary for running, but NOT walking, such as the butt and the achilles tendon. (chimps, big time walkers, don't have achilles tendons or much of a butt.)


    Also, I know Mark is trying to stay "open," but, realistically, he now has too much vested in his Primal Blueprint...we don't.


  8. #8
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    Sheesh,sorry, that incoherent reply was what happens when you're trying to type in a reply and get dinner on the table just as unexpected company arrives...

    hopefully the gist is there.


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    [quote]

    I am a runner and always will be, so it's not hard for me to accept the premise that humans are meant to run long distances.
    </blockquote>


    A perfect example of rationalization in the face of cognitive dissonance...


    The butt and Achilles tendon on man can be explained simply by standing and walking.
    [quote]

    The most powerful action of the Gluteus maximus is to cause the body to regain the erect position after stooping.
    </blockquote>


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluteus_maximus_muscle#Actions
    [quote]


    Bilateral Achilles tendon vibration in the absence of vision has a major impact on postural orientation.[1] Vibration applied to the Achilles tendon is well known to induce in freely standing subjects a backward body displacement and in restrained subjects an illusory forward body tilt.[2] The vibrations stimulate muscle spindles in the calf muscles. The muscle spindles alert the brain that the body is moving forward, so the central nervous system compensates by moving the body backwards.
    </blockquote>


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achilles_tendon


    Since when are chimps "big time walkers"?
    [quote]

    Among wild populations, gorillas and adult chimpanzees will both knuckle-walk about 85 percent of the time that they&#39;re moving.
    </blockquote>


    http://www.physorg.com/news169137362.html


    They also spend time climbing, so that&#39;s not a lot of time on two legs...

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

  10. #10
    Marie's Avatar
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    @Tarlach, I wasn&#39;t trying to rationalize... I just didn&#39;t finish my thought. It&#39;s not at all hard for me to accept the notion that we are meant to be runners, BUT I realize others may need more pursuading... or remain skeptics, as they wish.

    McDougall&#39;s point was that chimps aren&#39;t runners. All of the physiology in the book was very interesting, but I&#39;m not up for reducing it all down at the moment.

    As someone (Geoff?) said in an earlier post, today&#39;s (injured!!) runners do not run the same way our ancestors did. Walking in shoes everyday and then running in shoes that cause us to heal strike have changed our stride and caused us to torque ligaments and tendons and muscles that formerly worked in lovely harmony. (not to mentioned the weakened state of our feet to begin with from wearing shoes)


    I can&#39;t say every ancient people has a running tradition (I have no idea) but obviously some of the modern day hold-outs did: the Masai, Tarahumara, Bushmen, etc.

    I&#39;m not looking to change anybody&#39;s mind... just wanted to see who else read and appreciated that book.


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