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Thread: Salt, or specifically, sodium page

  1. #1
    jamesf3i's Avatar
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    Almost every recipe found here, or anywhere, contains sodium, sometimes a lot of it, in one form or another -- salt, baking soda, etc. The "experts" working for the gummint claim a maximum of 2400 mg sodium intake per day (one teaspoon salt). Other experts claim a maximum of 1500 mg sodium intake per day (2/3 teaspoon salt). A general agreement seems to be one needs only 500 mg per day to meet the body's sodium requirement (1/4 teaspoon salt).


    How much salt, or sodium, do you think Grok ate per day? I know there were "saltlicks" scattered around the world but they weren't everywhere. Many plants contain sodium, such as celery or spinach, but many don't. Meat such as venison, rabbit, birds, etc., do not have much, if any, sodium. I suspect the Groks living hundreds of miles from the oceans ate very little "salt." I am in complete agreement with the primal diet but our large intake of salt/sodium is, I think, very far from Cousin Grok's menu.


    I bring this up because I have, or had, high blood pressure, completely controlled by keeping my sodium intake to a self-imposed maximum of 900 mg per day. I am aware of others with the affliction, also controlling it with a very low sodium intake. Without having done any real research I suspect this high salt/sodium intake is a rather recent development, totally without any evolutionary help allowing us to fight the consequences of all that sodium.


  2. #2
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    No 'expert' - use celtic sea salt here & there...eat some sea veggies for iodine...and, well, viola!


    Not to trivialize what you ask, actually, I, too, have wondered about this because sodium/potassium is life, basically.


    What I understand is that tribes/natives did travel long distances & have sacred rites in relation to their salt sources, they would have their pilgrimage ever year or so & stock up..not only for their use, but for trading.


  3. #3
    Tarlach's Avatar
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    I believe that Grok had zero added salt and I think having excess salt is quite bad. Since cutting out almost all added salt (for a few years now), I'm really noticing the effects of what the stuff actually does to you.


    Once you remove added salt, you can really taste the natural salt in foods and they taste a lot better. 'normal' salted food tastes like poison now and I can't believe people actually eat it like that.


    There's plenty of sodium in food and there's no health reason to add more.

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

  4. #4
    Osa007's Avatar
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    If one is eating zero packaged products then you should have no problem with excess sodium. Given that adding salt (good salt) to, say, a stew, and that very little will go a very long way in addition to any naturally occuring sodium in other foods you eat. I eat zero packaged products (ok, ok, the watercress comes in some package to protect it's living roots, ok?)... Anyway...there IS evidence not just evidence, stories, of tribes going to salt sources....lived near one in southern NM...very eerie place & the source for all tribes in a very large radius to get salt. But, salt is different than 'sodium' gets complicated.... And as I pointed out - the balance of potassium & sodium is the life factor for cells, and, thus - you!


  5. #5
    NeoPaleo's Avatar
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    Would Grok have consumed more of the blood of the animals he ate? Either on purpose or just because he would not have an efficient way of removing it? And if so, how much more salt would that add to a diet? I have no idea myself, just asking...


    I've cut way down on salt myself over the last couple years, and like Tarlach, if I eat something with added salt, it's usually WAY too salty for me. I have to buy low salt bacon otherwise I just can't eat it (which kinda sucks, as all the bacon at the farmer's market is fully salted - the only low-salt bacon I can find, which also has no-nitrates added, is a local super-market's brand. It's not organic, but the package does say no anti-biotics or hormones, so that's a start.)


  6. #6
    kongluirong's Avatar
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    Osa has it right on the spot. The salt that "they" are referring to is the table salt available everywhere. It's so refined that all you get is sodium and iodine. Celtic Sea Salt has much more than that because of where and how it's harvested.


    Osa, do you order yours online because I cannot find it in any stores near me (whole foods, trader joes)...I just have plain sea salt.


  7. #7
    SerialSinner's Avatar
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    More than only it's supposed dietary benefits, I would say that salt had a very important role in preserving meat in the past, hence it's high value.


    Weston A. Price appears to have a very clear stand on dietary salt:



    [quote]

    Milk is salty because mammals need salt for the production of hydrochloric acid and for the development of the brain and nervous system. Without dietary salt, the human mind does not fully develop and man must live, not by his wits like the ingenious cave man from the dawn of time, but as a brute, even if he happens to be born in this modern age.
    </blockquote>




    http://tinyurl.com/y8ck829


    I am not sure if I buy this to be honest. Sodium plays a fundamental role in homeostasis and cell physiology, but I am not completely convinced about needing it as a necessary dietary supplement.


    There is also supposed to be a direct link between chronic systemic inflammation and hypertension. Art Ayers touches the topic on his post about ED:



    [quote]

    I suspect that endothelial cells of capillaries are compromised by biofilm-derived endotoxins that ultimately contribute to apoptosis, decrease in capillary beds and elevation of blood pressure. All of these assaults on endothelial cells undermine penile vasculature and contribute to ED.
    </blockquote>




    http://tinyurl.com/yz6dk4u


    I am inclined to think that we do not *need* dietary supplements of salt, and that we could pull-off some of it without negative consequences. It might even be beneficial to some in moderation. There seems to be a lot of bad CW behind blaming salt for hypertension. I&#39;m not necessarily saying they are not connected, but the link might be way weaker than we were told...

    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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    Personal opinion / observations here:

    - I always forgot to buy salt (!) so I got used to cooking and eating without it. I do find a lot of things too salty now (same as being too sweet now I&#39;ve cut way back on sugar)


    - I now use salt sparingly in soups etc, or to raise the water temperature when boiling veg.


    - Note that herbivores (horses, sheep cattle etc) need to be given salt licks


    - note that carnivores (domestic, at least) do NOT need salt licks


    - to me, a good steak is just salty enough.


    Therefore my grand, completely unscientific, conclusions are that meat will proved the right levels of sodium, but veg will not. So maybe vegetarians SHOULD add salt...


    PS - I used a whole tub of salt yesterday......to cure a rabbit skin


  9. #9
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    As some research will show, natural foods usually have a lot of potassium and little sodium. There&#39;s your clue. That includes almost all vegetables, not just a "few" and meats, too. I came across something the other day, sure can&#39;t remember what it was, but it was even. I was rather surprised.


    Salt consumption, in the latest research has about zip to do with propensity for heart attacks.


    When I went on a "salt hunt" a few months ago I was surprised to find that cheese was my biggest culprit. Turns out that adding salt helps curdle the milk. Brined olives, natch. Other sources were inconsequential or matched by potassium.


    You can easily alter the sodium/potassium ratio by using salt substitute, potassium chloride, as much as possible. There is a limiting factor because it actually has some bitterness to it. But up to the point of distaste, add it to anything and everything.


  10. #10
    bobbylight's Avatar
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    OTB, I use that same method. It is great because I know that I am getting enough potassium.


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