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Thread: Parsnips & Turnips page

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    geostump's Avatar
    geostump is offline Senior Member
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    Parsnips & Turnips

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    I'm making soup and I was thinking of using parsnips & turnips in it. I've never used either of those before and was wondering if the flavors of both would be ok in a soup?

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    Zophie's Avatar
    Zophie is offline Senior Member
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    Ya, they should be good.

    I have put them both in a regular stew type soup and also made chowder with them.

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    Mud Flinger is offline Senior Member
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    I sometimes put parnips in my chicken soup. They look like white carrots and taste kinda sweet. I like 'em. The family probably mostly puts up with it though!

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    I use both often. Curried parsnip soup is divine (if you like curry flavours....). And turnip, parsnip, with carrot make a really good root veg soup. If it tastes too sweet for you - add the juice of a lemon.

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    Parsnips can have a kind of woody/early flavour, not dissimilar to celeriac but more on the front of the tongue. Turnips are quite bland. I'd go for larger pieces of turnip and smaller (1cm square) pieces of parsnip in a stew/soup. Parsnip chips are nice ... fry 'em in dripping.

    Chuck 'em in and see how you like them. You'll get the hang of it.

  6. #6
    peril's Avatar
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    Parsnips are a standard soup-mix vegetable here
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

  7. #7
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    Both veggies hold up well to long hours in the slow cooker.

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    I tossed parsnips in my last pot roast (8-10 hour cooking time) and they were horrible. I love parsnips but they didn't get tender enough and were too woody and stringy. I wish you more success than I had.
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    I'm not a big fan of turnips and I can almost always taste them-even in soups and stews. They give a weird tang (can't describe it better, sorry). Hubby loves them and says they are perfect potato substitutes so *shrug*

    Good luck cooking!
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  10. #10
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    jhc
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    Turnips work fine in most situations, but be aware that the taste of parsnip is very pervasive; adding them to just about anything will turn it into Parsnip _____ because you can always taste the parsnip (which is fine so long as you like parsnip).

    I tossed parsnips in my last pot roast (8-10 hour cooking time) and they were horrible. I love parsnips but they didn't get tender enough and were too woody and stringy. I wish you more success than I had.
    Uh, did they dry out? Because parsnip starts out with a carrot-like texture and cooks just like a carrot as well, but you have to be careful roasting them because they do dry out.
    Last edited by jhc; 06-19-2011 at 07:35 PM.

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