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  1. #1
    davem's Avatar
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    Crab cakes a la primal

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    Really was wanting some crab cakes tonight, which works since I found some good stuff at Trader Joe's recently! This recipe will yield plenty for two + leftovers, or easily a nice meal for 4.

    1 16oz can of Claw meat from TJ's (it's canned, but it's decent, replace with 16oz dungeness if you can)
    1 ex. large egg
    2 T. Dijon Mustard
    2 oz. minced red onion
    "1/2c." almond meal (got mine from TJs)
    Lawry's season salt (to taste)
    1/2 t. oregano
    3T. Capers chopped
    Black pepper (to taste)
    2 t. garlic paste
    1/2 t. garlic powder

    Real easy to make: Open the can of crab and let it drain. While draining, mix all ingredients (except for crab) together in a mixing bowl, should have the consistency of a medium thick paste/pudding. Start with around 1/2c. almond meal. Add crab and gently blend together with your hands, be careful not to break up the crab clumps. Form a small cake and cook in olive oil to taste the mix. Adjust for flavor after tasting. If the cake is a little too wet and not holding together well, you can adjust consistency with mustard (to make a little looser) and almond meal to help it bind and be a little drier.

    When correct consistency, let sit in the fridge for 30 minutes. Bring out, shape into cakes using your hands or an ice cream scoop, form into a patty and dredge top and bottom with almond meal. Cooking over med low heat in olive oil until browned and cooked through. Looking for an optimal internal temp of about 145-150F, just enough to make sure it's safe, but not overcooked.

    Note: You can make large 4oz + cakes, to do these brown on top and bottom then finish in a 400 degree oven, should take 6-8 minutes if the cake is fat, 4-6 if thin.

    Enjoy with some aioli, lemon juice, sauteed fiddleheads, salad, bourbon, whatever.

  2. #2
    Nutritionator's Avatar
    Nutritionator is offline Senior Member
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    Cannot WAIT to try these, have never made my own crab cakes but I always used to love getting them from restaurants. Thanks for the recipe!
    My Paleo Project:

    www.nutritionator.com

  3. #3
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    Never made crab cakes either. Just a hour ago, I was actually dumbly staring at the cans of claw meat in the supermarket before resigning myself to sardines, tuna, and salmon. Thanks for providing a plan for me to tackle the suckers!

  4. #4
    davem's Avatar
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    Don't be afraid to make them, they're totally easy!

    My key suggestions are: premix everything before adding the crab, mix gently once the crab is in and avoid breaking up lumps.

    Also, when you make the cakes compress them enough to hold together, but don't press them into hockey pucks.

    Finally, turn them and cook them gently. Also... Practice often. I make these a lot and this is the first time I subbed out flour, so nice, great texture, but it is a loosely bound cake compared to flour. I could eat like 50 of these...

    Let me know how your experiments go!

  5. #5
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    A suggestions - use coconut oil for frying. It gives a great taste and a wonderful aroma while cooking. My son loves them cooked this way. The other suggestion would be to find some Old Bay Seasoning (there are online recipes to make your own if they don't sell it where you are) and use instead of the salt and powdered seasonings. You may need to experiment with it.

    OK, one more suggestion - since you've got time to put it in the fridge, put in them in patties on a plate, then put in the fridge.

    What I've learned over time is not to have too many chunky ingredients like onions and peppers, as much as I love them, and use Old Bay or other seasonings for flavor. Or, take the time to cut these items up very small and still don't use too much. The cakes stay together better.

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    davem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dellastreet View Post
    What I've learned over time is not to have too many chunky ingredients like onions and peppers, as much as I love them, and use Old Bay or other seasonings for flavor. Or, take the time to cut these items up very small and still don't use too much. The cakes stay together better.
    Agree about chunky ingredients, it's not a deal killer but they can take the focus off of the crab. Now old bay, I like it for crayfish and catfish, not a huge fan for crab. It's too celery salt-y. The neat thing about the crab cakes is that they are infinitely tailorable once you have the base mix.

    I don't like to make them into patties while resting, I prefer to do that a la minute. Anecdotally, letting them sit preformed in the fridge has led to drier crab cakes, they didn't bind any better, but I didn't have to form them before adding to the pan.

    The coconut oil is probably pretty awesome! I haven't pulled the trigger on it because I haven't found any stores locally selling it for less than $35 a pound. So, I'm "stuck" with good olive oil and butter.

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