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Thread: Cyclists I need help with a bike page 2

  1. #11
    TigerLily's Avatar
    TigerLily is offline Senior Member
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    I just went to that site. Do you not have a bike shop in your town? I would highly, highly recommend you deal with a local bike shop rather than buying one online. You will want to take some bikes for a test spin and test out different saddles. You will need to be bringing it in for adjustments and for your fitting.
    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

  2. #12
    Catherine's Avatar
    Catherine is offline Senior Member
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    i just want to say that just because you're female you do NOT necessarily need a women-specific design. None of my bikes are women-specific, and they're all stock sizes, not custom.

    from what i understand of the WSD (women specific design), it's designed for people with shorter torsos & longer legs. Which is the complete opposite of me.

    If you really want to buy a bike, i highly suggest that you go to the local bicycle shop. They want to help! Cyclists HATE to see people on ill-fitting bikes! Tell the shop how much you want to spend and they'll go from there. Some shops even have rentals. My LBS does.

    i can't give you any advice about tri's, but i suspect that the other posters are right & you'll see bikes at every pricepoint at your race.

    Good luck!

  3. #13
    quelsen's Avatar
    quelsen is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigerLily View Post
    These people throwing around all this expensive bike geek jargon is making me angry. You people are being ridiculous.

    Get a used Trek WSD (women-specific design) from the bike shop. Pay $100 to have it custom fit for you.

    One thing to consider is the heaviness of the bike because you will need to be getting it on and off a bike rack OR in and out of the back of your truck/SUV. For that reason, I went with a little higher quality bike (as they are lighter), and I'm so glad I did.

    Triathlon can become an expensive endeavor, if you allow it. Don't fall into that trap. I'm not kidding you when I tell you there will be people there on Huffys and running in Chuck Taylors.
    Dont hate :-) we are just sharing our experience of the world. I am happy yours is different. I would never be able to ride a huffy they alwys fall apart under my 360 pound frame
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  4. #14
    Reborn Grokker's Avatar
    Reborn Grokker is offline Senior Member
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    I found a bike shop in the next town over--about 15 min drive, so I'll go check some out, I can at least get fitted and then look for some online if they don't have something in my price range--thanks for the help.
    Heidi

    33yo, 5'6", 158lbs, size 10 jeans

  5. #15
    denbro01's Avatar
    denbro01 is offline Senior Member
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    Craiglist! Like other posters have said...don't buy online. No need to spend a fortune BUT you will get what you pay for. I've read some good reviews about bikedirect.com and some awful reviews.

  6. #16
    Boy_Dinosaur's Avatar
    Boy_Dinosaur is offline Junior Member
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    Grokker-

    (I've spend 8 years working in bike shops doing fittings, mechanic work, sales, etc)

    To answer your original question, I would lean you towards 2 bikes from that website, here are my takes on each (they both have similar parts, so I will comment on frame design)

    The Gravity Liberty
    This bike comes with a straight bladed fork and compact geometry. This basically means that is will be a bit more responsive with a slightly stiffer ride. Think closer to the performance side of things

    Mercier Galaxy AL SC3
    Notice this one has a curved fork, longer wheel base, and adjustable stem. So by looking at it, I would expect it to be a little less responsive (accelarating, turns, etc) but a bit more compliant (smoother ride). The adjustable stem will allow you to raise and lower the handlebar for a more comfortable fit at the sacrifice of some weight.

    Something else to consider is putting it together. You may want to ask the bike shop what they would charge to assemble and tune it. The website probobly says it's ready to go out of the box, but they never are. A proper tune up and build will make it much more enjoyable. You could also see if the bike shop has rentals available. Just be sure to test ride several different kinds of bikes to see what you like best.

    It is always better to by a bike from a local shop to ensure proper fit and have the mechanical support when needed, but I can certainly understand the economics of shopping on line. Feel free to post up any other questions if you'd like more input. Prepare to be addicted!
    Last edited by Boy_Dinosaur; 06-10-2011 at 02:50 PM.

  7. #17
    Reborn Grokker's Avatar
    Reborn Grokker is offline Senior Member
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    THANK YOU Boy_Dinosaur!!!!! That's totally what I was looking for. I went by a local shop yesterday and they said they do get used bikes, but they go so fast, and no rentals. My Boss rides for the Army cycling team and has many bikes of his own, plus knows many other bikers--he took my height and inseam and is asking around through his network to see what he can find for me. I've got a few weeks before I need an actual bike, I can cover down with a spin bike for now. If I need to order one, I will, and my boss will be able to put it together and whatnot since he builds his own bikes all the time.

    Thanks again for the great info!!!!
    Heidi

    33yo, 5'6", 158lbs, size 10 jeans

  8. #18
    IvyBlue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by denbro01 View Post
    Craiglist! Like other posters have said...don't buy online. No need to spend a fortune BUT you will get what you pay for. I've read some good reviews about bikedirect.com and some awful reviews.
    Show up w/ $275 cash and you'd get this most likely. Specialized Allez Just a 30 second perusal, I've had pretty good luck w/ CL.
    Wheat is the new tobacco. Spread the word.

  9. #19
    urpeite's Avatar
    urpeite is offline Junior Member
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    on bike buying

    Reborn Groker and Tiger Lilly.... the people throwing around "expensive bike jargon" (and honestly there was very little jargon) are trying to help and answer your question. And they are right. It's not really fair to ask for an experienced onion and then berate the people who don't give you the answer you want.

    The best advice was given in the first response. Which bike from bikes direct under $400? None.
    The most frustrating thing with people who are new to bikes, is explain how much fit matters.

    Would you do you Tri in running shoes that were not your size? Of course not. You could do it but I'd pretty much guarantee that you wouldn't enjoy the experience and wouldn't do it again. Same thing with the bike. A bike that is "just one size" to big or small will be detrimental to your experience.

    Also, putting the bike together is a safety issue. Even in your first tri you will be reaching speeds of around 30 mph, and on a bike that was not properly put together this could be very dangerous. It is impossible to ship a bike that is fully assembled, so there will be some assembly required.

    If your boss knows enough to measure and properly fit you to a bike, then he will be able to help you find a used bike for around $400 (or less) that will be much better than any new one on the internet. Also, if you buy a used one in your area you can try it out first. Even if you get the right size, buying a bike without trying it is akin to buying shoes without trying them on (sizes vary between manufacturers). Since a bike is more expensive than shoes, it's a much bigger risk.

    The reason we (experienced cyclists) are giving you this advice, is because WE WANT YOU TO ENJOY CYCLING. I'm sure I speak for the other cyclists on here in saying we would much rather have you enjoy cycling and share our passion, than hate it and never do it again. If you buy a bike online sight unseen the chances of that are very low.

    Sorry for the rant, I hope it gave you a little more insight, and good luck with your race!
    -pete

  10. #20
    Bootneck's Avatar
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    Hi Reborn

    Don't listen to the bike snobs, they are talking rubbish. If you are only just dipping your toe into Tri / cycling this is more than good enough: Road Bikes - Dawes Sheila Women Specific Road Bike, for your needs. At the good/elite level the bike makes all the difference if everything else is equal, but ultimately its the engine (you) I am competetive MTB rider and I purchased all my bikes off the internet over the last few years with no problems. Just go to a bike shop and try sizes ask for help, they don't know your not going to buy, also print a web price off and ask them to beat or match it for a similiar or better spec, everyone is fighting for custom so you might as well try.

    Good luck with the race.

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