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Thread: Will these food allergies keep me out of a primal diet? page

  1. #1
    pmiker's Avatar
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    Will these food allergies keep me out of a primal diet?

    Primal Fuel
    Ok, so here are the allergies:
    Oats and corn. Should not be a problem on a low carb diet.
    Birds and pork. This means no chicken, duck, turkey or eggs. The pork is weird. I cannot eat plain pork as in a pork chop but bacon and sausage do not seem to affect me. These allergies have been confirmed by a doctor years ago.

    Add to this the fact that I am low income and live in a rural area and you may see my dilemma. Grain fed beef and local veggies are expensive and hard to find. Processed food is easy to find.

    I'm reading the primal blueprint and have not yet seen any recipes. I've begun cutting back on carbs.
    Thanks,
    Mike

  2. #2
    Nion's Avatar
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    You shouldn't be eating oats and corn anyway on Primal, or any grain.
    It doesn't *have* to be grass fed beef. Just try to source the best stuff you can reasonably afford, any improvement is a good step!
    It's more about eating whole, real foods. We're a one (regular) income family and a slow cooker was a good investment. I buy lots of the cheaper tough cuts and stew them for a few hours - delicious and nutritious!
    Last edited by Nion; 06-06-2011 at 10:56 AM.
    I'm a paleo foodie, come check out my recipes: http://strangekitty.ca/

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    Beef and fish sound like they'll be your staple meats, then.

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    It shouldn't be a problem. I have a chicken/egg allergy and do just fine.

    Just cut out the grains and sugar first and do the best you can with what you can get in your area.

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    In addition to beef and fish, you could add lamb and venison and buffalo and any other meat you can think of. And then veggies, fruits, nuts and seeds, good fats (like butter if you tolerate dairy). Play around with it and see what you can do/what works for you. We are a low income family and I've found it is actually just about as cheap to eat all real food that has been cooked from scratch when compared to my old diet that included packaged grains and processed foods...

    Also, some would argue that getting most of your animal fat and protein from ruminants (beef, lamb, venison, buffalo, etc) and seafood while limiting intake of (fatty) poultry and pork may actually be optimal for omega 3/6 ratios. There are far fewer omega fats in ruminants (b/c so much of the fat is saturated) as opposed to pork and poultry (which have higher proportions of PUFAs, and are heavier on the O6 side). The perfect health diet book goes into this in depth. (Can't find a link that talks about it but perhaps searching the site will be helpful? Perfect Health Diet)

    Good luck with it all! And, if it seems too limiting, just cutting grains and sugar can make a HUGE (positive) impact on your health anyway. Kurt Harris (panu, archevore--google those as I'm on the run) has a list of steps for taking toxic foods out that might be helpful and ease you into this while you're dealing with the limitations of those food allergies.
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    You may find this link helpful. And you can always sub beef or fish (etc) for poultry or pork in most recipes...

    Primal Blueprint Recipes on Mark’s Daily Apple | Mark's Daily Apple
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    Beef, bacon, fish, and no grains... you & Primal are gonna get along juuuuuuuuuust fine!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nion View Post
    You shouldn't be eating oats and corn anyway on Primal, or any grain.
    It doesn't *have* to be grass fed beef. Just try to source the best stuff you can reasonably afford, any improvement is a good step!
    It's more about eating whole, real foods. We're a one (regular) income family and a slow cooker was a good investment. I buy lots of the cheaper tough cuts and stew them for a few hours - delicious and nutritious!
    +1
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    The allergies definitely shouldn't keep you from going primal. Grass-fed/pasture-raised is highly recommended, but by not means required.

    Also, buying local/in season will keep a lot of your food costs down. Localharvest.org will help you locate local producers/markets near you. Also, organ meats (liver, kidneys, et cetera) are frequently much much cheaper than other portions of the animal (I can get beef tongue for $2 total from my local butcher which will last me WELL over a week). Go for tougher cuts (connective tissues can be tenderized by long cooking) as they're also less expensive.

    Someone linked to this yesterday, I've never personally used them, but for conventional meat the prices are pretty dang good: Welcome - Angel Food Ministries See if there is a local one near you.

    Co-ops are another good place for good quality, low priced foods. Where I live, there's one that is even specifically natural/organic.

    If you can afford a larger initial outlay of cash and have the freezer space, buying a side/quarter or even a whole cow is extremely economical. You might be able to get a couple neighbors to go in on it with you. There are four of us in my neighborhood who will buy a grass-fed whole cow at an amazingly cheap price. The butcher should have zero problem breaking the animal down into portioned packages (and there's always a TON of ground beef).

  10. #10
    pmiker's Avatar
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    Thanks for the encouragement

    This primal thing is going to just wreak havoc with my bread making hobby!

    We have two groceries in town. One is Walmart. I can't say that there stuff impresses me. I'll have to scout around if I want decent fruits and veggies at a good price.

    I've replaced breakfast cereal with grapefruit and almonds. I could take sardines to work for lunch but I'd have to eat alone most likely. I'll save up for the cookbook to see if it helps with meal planning. I can also add more fish to my diet. Something other than the breaded fish sticks my wife makes on Friday evenings.

    I don't have and cannot afford a freezer so that's out. My old one died and I haven't been able to replace it.

    I can think of some alternate meats to beef such as lamb and rabbit but both are uncommon out here and expensive. I may be able to by venison from some hunter's next winter.

    It sounds as if the ground beef we buy should not necessarily be extra lean. I haven't got to that part of the book yet.

    I'll help the wife shop next time.
    Thanks again,
    Mike

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