Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Shin Splints? page

  1. #1
    Toefuzz's Avatar
    Toefuzz is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    42

    Shin Splints?

    It seems shin splints has become a pretty generic term for anything wrong with your shins while running/walking, so I'm not sure if that's what I really have, just the easiest way to describe it. A little background, I am 5'10" and 271 so I am significantly overweight. Volunteered to run a 25k in honor of a lost friend (my wife says I have problems with impulse control), fortunately it's not until May of 2012. I started the Couch to 5k program and my biggest problem has been pain in my shins. It's gotten better (used to get them just walking the dog at a reasonable rate) but I'm stuck on week 3. For those of you not familiar with the program it's interval based (5 min. warmup walk, jog 90 seconds, walk 90 seconds, jog 3 minutes, walk 3 minutes, etc). I'm stuck at a point where my longest jog is 3 minutes and can't make it through the next workout (which bumps the jogging portion significantly, several intervals of 5 min. with limited walking in between). I went to a real running store and was fit for shoes which did seem to help. I stretch beforehand, have tried ibuprofen beforehand, etc but nothing seems to have helped.

    It's frustrating b/c the rest of my body feels better than expected while jogging, I just can't get through this stupid shin pain. Any brilliant ideas? I'll try anything once

  2. #2
    gordo's Avatar
    gordo is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    712
    The usual cause is high-heeled sneakers coupled with a heel landing. Given your weight, they almost certainly sold you a lot of cushion. That's bad. Really bad. Were it me, I'd go completely barefoot. This site has lots of useful advice:

    Begin Here!! The Running Barefoot

    And no, you don't need cushion. In fact, the heavier you are, the more cushioning will mess you up. Flyweights can get away with anything.

    Gordo

  3. #3
    yodiewan's Avatar
    yodiewan is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    3,528
    I've been nursing a shin splint for two months now and I'm getting really tired of it. Obviously, I don't have any really good advice or I would be healed by now! Traditional advice is to ice it after running and maybe wrap it (Ace bandage) before.

    Gordo, I agree that barefoot/minimalist is the way to go for preventing shin splints and is best for overall health and posture, etc., but I'm starting to think that some support may be helpful for recovering from shin splints after they've occured. I wear RunAMocs when I'm not barefoot and I don't think they've helped me recover at all. I'm considering wearing something slightly more supportive (maybe Trail Gloves) to see if it helps. At this point I'm willing to try almost anything. I really miss sprinting.

  4. #4
    davidwhitt's Avatar
    davidwhitt is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    13
    I have had bad shin splints in the past. They were worse walking than running. As I have gone primal and taken off the last 10 lbs (from 235 to 225) they have nearly gone away. I was told that they were from calcium deposits. I am not sure if the reduced weight is what has helped or if my body is better at sending calcium to the right places. In the article about teeth yesterday, Mark talks about sending calcium to the right places and I think he mentioned how important Vitamin D is for that (I have been taking D and also walking outside in the sun a lot). I also agree about the shoes. My last pair of shoes were extra cushiony new balances and they seemed to make them worse. My next pair will be truly minimalist.

  5. #5
    Hedonist's Avatar
    Hedonist is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Sacramento, California
    Posts
    2,927
    Quote Originally Posted by gordo View Post
    The usual cause is high-heeled sneakers coupled with a heel landing. Given your weight, they almost certainly sold you a lot of cushion. That's bad. Really bad. Were it me, I'd go completely barefoot. This site has lots of useful advice:

    Begin Here!! The Running Barefoot

    And no, you don't need cushion. In fact, the heavier you are, the more cushioning will mess you up. Flyweights can get away with anything.

    Gordo
    Fuzz, DO NOT go directly from high-heeled sneakers to barefoot. Your feet are crippled from years of being in those little coffins. Lose the shoes at home, for sure. But take it slow outside. It took Mark a month to get used to VFFs. For less athletic type, it can take a lot longer. You can transition by getting a minimal shoe for outside. I use Chuck Taylors.
    Ancestral Health Info

    I design websites and blogs for a living. If you would like a blog or website designed by someone who understands Primal, see my web page.

    Primal Blueprint Explorer My blog for people who are not into the Grok thing. Since starting the blog, I have moved close to being Archevore instead of Primal. But Mark's Daily Apple is still the best source of information about living an ancestral lifestyle.

  6. #6
    Toefuzz's Avatar
    Toefuzz is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    42
    Thanks for the tips everyone... will try a minimalist shoe. I am a heavy overpronator (the guy actually laughed at me, but in a friendly way)... my wife says one of the shoes they had me try on looked like a nurses walking shoe it had so much support.

  7. #7
    Barefoot Paul's Avatar
    Barefoot Paul is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Ames, IA
    Posts
    119
    My advice is also take of the shoes. Take it slow and listen to your body. I would also say go back to just doing the walking until the shin pain goes away. but hey, I don't really know much about preventing shin splints. I used to get them when I was in highschool during track and soccer seasons. I've heard all the advice about how to treat them/prevent them, and didn't find any of it really all that effective. I now run less and only barefoot. I'm barefoot almost constantly. I agree with Hedonist somewhat that it will take a while to adjust to being barefoot as I'm still noticing changes in my feet and I've been going almost constant barefoot (or flip flops when i absolutely have to wear shoes) for almost 2 years now. Overall, I think you should go at the pace you feel most comfortable with.

  8. #8
    critta's Avatar
    critta is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Richmond VA
    Posts
    121
    I agree with the barefoot/minimal shoe recommendations. I had shin splints in high school and when I started being active again about 2 years ago. I agree with you, that this is a generic catch all term for anything going on with you shin and never found the traditional ice etc to resolve the issue. I switched over to using minimalist shoes a little over a year ago and after that my shin issues went away. Once it got cold i ran in my old running shoes exactly once. After that one day my shins were back to their old games, which i now realize was more related to using the front shin muscle in a braking action with a heel strike, than from the actual impact of the foot landing. This may not be true for everyone but it was for me and I would have never guess that to be the root cause of my problem

    It is important to listen to the advice of don't start to fast with minimalist shoes because you can really injure yourself if you over do it to soon. Following one of the getting started programs linked to above is a great idea to help you avoid the common pit falls.

  9. #9
    AmyKickass's Avatar
    AmyKickass is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    29
    I had awful shin splints for quite a while. Over the course of those issues being on the receiving end of a lot of well-intentioned advice I realized is that everyone who has shin splints has a different cause and thus different cure. Try different things until you figure out what works for you. For me I need to keep the muscles in my calves loose (gastroc and soleus) or they start to pull on the front part of the shin. Stretching helps, but rolling out on a foam roller, lacrosse ball, or trigger point roller work best. For some people it's sitting in ice water to their knees that cures them, others have to strengthen the muscles in the front of the shin. Minimal shoes can't hurt, but get your feet and legs used to them gradually. Most importantly - listen to your body through all of this.

    Good luck!
    Peace. Love. Steak.

  10. #10
    shacky's Avatar
    shacky is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    12
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    I would also recommend shortening your stride and make sure you are landing under COG.
    Exercises such as heel lifts and calf raises probably wouldn't hurt either.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •