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Thread: Reverting to the SAD an experiment (caution end is a little gross) page 2

  1. #11
    BlazeKING's Avatar
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    Those symptoms sound a lot like mine when I ate wheat products.


  2. #12
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    I like the openess and honesty of your post, it makes you sound more human, humble... more like Grok.

    Indeed bigotry, inhibition, prudishness and stiffness are not very primal. And Diamond would argue that not even male-chauvinism, machoism and attempt to pass for an insensitive piece of wood in order to appear more "mainly" are primal.


  3. #13
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    Well said, Niklas.


    I would add that "individualism" was a complete head scratcher for Grok's tribe. The group was more important than the individual.


    Rampant individualism, Ayn Rand's "objectivism", libertarianism, all are counter to what got us through millions of years of adversity.


    It does "take a village."


  4. #14
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    I'm rather disturbed by how alienated our sociey has made us. We used to live in villages where everyone interacted with other people and everyone had a role and tasks for the well being of the community and children and kids were not considered an insular group disconnetted from older people but real members of the community with valued skill and tasks to do and they also shared the same expectations and hopes of their parents so the family was actually a place were people went after same goals and helped each other not a place were to play roles and stir intergenerational battles (Margaret Mead actually showed that no concept of youth angst or intergenerational conflict exists in non-modern populations)


    And after a whole day of interactions, small tasks and some leasire time, everyone would enjoy the result of the daily effort with an hearty dinner and lot of music. Bacchanalians were actually based on the phylosophy that you need a short-term goal to complete togheter in orther to enjoy its fruits. That's why everyone would do something to organize the dinner (i.e. someone would cook, someone would bring the chairs, someone would decore a table cloth, someone would seek the best flowers, someone would sweep the ground... of course children too) and then finally enjoyed it. What always fascinated me about this is that one thought working together for a goal was "annoying" or "dreadful". Humans love to work, love to spend their time doing somethng that makes sense... what they hate is alienation and dullness of organized job system.


    I actually think kids show more maturity in this area than older people, they're more interested in the village just like Grok. It is known that a reason why certain kids (not all of them) learn another language fluently is that they interact more while adults isolate themselves. Kids love to form groups and belong to groups and they (rightly so) full suffucated in the alienating nuclear family.


    When kids write on a forum or on a pen-pal page in a magazine, they always say something like "I hope to find lot of friends" or "I hope to make lot of friends here". Most recognize such words as juvenile because adults rarely want to make friends and are usually navely fulfilled by their asphyxiating nuclear family (even a family can become "excessive individualsm" by obsessing with a single role or thinking of members of the family as property and alienating by the rest of the world) but it shouldn't be so and kudos to kids for keeping alive the tribe or band primal instinct.

    There are islander cultures were kids form their own communities and live on their own and someone studying the population said this arrangement of kids living on their own and learnng to take care of each other is better for them than when they're under the charge of adults.


    just few thoughts

    (going off-topic is extremely primal, disciplined thinking came with the post-agricultural control freeks)


  5. #15
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    I didn't embark on SAD (or British version!) but I did have a slip up with an oaty flapjack the other day, for which I'm bearing the consequences still. It was organic, I was in an un-primal situation blah blah blah. Anyway, i thought I would be ok, but no. Horrendous bloating, gas, constipation, a rash, headaches... Ugh. I'm not sure if I can't deal with oats, or if it is because the product was prepared in a gluten contminated environment (I'm intolerant). But you can be sure, I won't be making that mistake again!


    Funny though - seeing how terrible I felt because of one small item, I can't believe how long I put up with that level of 'health' before doing something positive about it, rather than just taking medication to deal with the symptoms....


  6. #16
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    "Rampant individualism, Ayn Rand's 'objectivism', libertarianism, all are counter to what got us through millions of years of adversity."


    And things like this, I imagine, are why Mark appears to advises, when it comes to the wisdom of our ancestors, to do as Ken Kesey said:


    "Take what you can use, and let the rest go by."


  7. #17
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    +1 frogfarm - I've said it before - we're all individuals with our own minds - at the end of the day it's our own choice how we live primally. Some weeks I'm 100%, some weeks not so much. I know the guidelines, it's up to me how I follow them.


  8. #18
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    A few years ago I spent ten days in a tiny village in Mexico. It was almost astride the Continental Divide on the western edge of Chihuahua high on a mesa and three hours from the nearest pavement. They lived on subsistence farming of corn, beans,fruit, and cattle. There were about ten families of assorted ages.


    It was an interesting experience and I still reflect on what I observed. The people were not poor, they had money in (distant) banks, some had a second home, most had a truck or car. They had solar powered electric lighting! Once a month a doctor and nurse came to give medical care through the national health care system.


    Anyway, they indeed relied on each other a lot. Helping with the harvest, all pitching in to add a porch to the medical building, etc. They had a CB radio, provided by la mumicipio for emergency services, it also let nearby villages know that a cow was to be slaughtered.


    I observed it indeed took a village, and a municipio, and a state to make their lives functional. Not much room for doing it "my way."


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    I've had similar problems, which I managed to somehow temporarily alleviate or ignore for many years. I am reminded of the issue when I 'cheat' - usually a pizza or a couple of cookies will do it. It feels like what I imagine Irritable Bowel Syndrome feels like. It is as if I've become completely intolerant of processed carbs.


  10. #20
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    My mother has had IBS in one form or another most of her life. She has been hospitalized twice this year for life threatening diarrhea. She even subjected herself to another colonoscopy trying to find resolution.


    Well, after the best docs couldn't come up with a solution and told her to get more fiber, I went the other way: Almost no fiber, six grams a day.


    It's the processed grains like white bread and white rice that are fiber free and hence offer relief to her.


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