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    Vivian's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel


    ....sry more talk about grains....does this even make sense? how can an ANTI-nutrient be good?


    products (Gerhardt & Gallo, 1998).

    Antinutrients

    Antinutrients found in grains include digestive enzyme

    (protease and amylase) inhibitors, phytic acid, haemagglutinins,

    and phenolics and tannins. Protease inhibitors,

    phytic acid, phenolics and saponins have been shown to

    reduce the risk of cancer of the colon and breast in animals.

    Phytic acid, lectins, phenolics, amylase inhibitors and

    saponins have also been shown to lower plasma glucose,

    insulin and/or plasma cholesterol and triacylglycerols

    (Slavin et al. 1999). In grains, protease inhibitors make up

    5–10 % of the water-soluble protein and are concentrated in

    the endosperm and embryo.


    http://wheatfoods.org/_FileLibrary/P...rticle0504.pdf


  2. #2
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    That's not all. They also interfere with vitamin D processing.


    Some examples of the roles of vit D: http://tinyurl.com/ycb3782

    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
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    Vivian's Avatar
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    serialsinner...im confused i think they're saying that these antinutrietns are good.


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    yaysus, thought the paper supported the PB, let me read it.

    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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    Ok so its a literature review about studies suggesting that whole grains are protective. As far as I can see, it's basically a CW compilation.


    As you say, there is very little reference to the antinutrients:
    [quote]

    Other compounds in grains, including antioxidants, phytic acid, lectins, phenolic compounds, amylase inhibitors, and saponins have all been shown to alter risk factors for CHD. It is probable that the combination of compounds in grains, rather than any one component, explains their protective effects in CHD.
    </blockquote>


    For some reason, they assign positive properties to antinutrients, look:
    [quote]

    Whole grains also contain several antinutrients, such as protease inhibitors, phytic acid, phenolics and saponins, which until recently were thought to have only negative nutritional consequences. Some of these antinutrient compounds may act as cancer inhibitors by preventing the formation of carcinogens and by blocking the interaction of carcinogens with cells. Other potential mechanisms linking whole grains to a reduced cancer risk include large-bowel effects, antioxidants, alterations in blood glucose levels, weight loss, hormonal effects, and the influence of numerous biologically active compounds.
    </blockquote>


    Both of the above statements are apparently based on the opinion of the author, as no sources are cited.


    It is also worth noting that there is no reference to the effect of a high carb diet in the hormone leptin, and there is no mention at all about inflammation.


    I also noticed the following:
    [quote]

    Consumers of whole grains were more likely to be male, older, white, more educated, non-smokers, exercisers, vitamin and/or mineral supplement users, and not overweight and have a higher income (Cleveland et al. 2000). White males and females over the age of 60 years consumed more whole grains/d than any other age group, with males eating 1·3 servings/d and females eating 1·0 servings/d. Black adult males also consumed more servings/d (0·7) than did black females (0·6). Consumers of whole grains had a significantly better nutrient profile than non-consumers.
    </blockquote>


    I think the above kind of undermines the study, wouldn&#39;t you think? They associate whole grain consumption with good health in people who already have a healthier lifestyle and more money to buy whole foods (in Whole Foods?) than average. However, to be sure, I would need to check the methodology of the all the sources and see what type of assumptions they are making. I&#39;m way to lazy for that.


    And finally, the cherry on top of the ice cream:
    [quote]

    There has been considerable emphasis on low-fat diets for reduced heart disease. However, the type of fat consumed is important as well as the amount of fat. If the fat is saturated, LDL and total cholesterol increase, but decrease when the fat is unsaturated. In studies with individual fatty acids, stearic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid were associated with lowering total and LDL-cholesterol. Other studies show the cholesterol-lowering effect of grain lipids or highlipid bran products (Gerhardt & Gallo, 1998).
    </blockquote>
    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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    Vivian's Avatar
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    thanks for the extensive breakdown....i just wanted to know if what they said was true...it doesnt really make much sense though


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    SS, my father would fit into that quite nicely. He&#39;s very healthy, doesn&#39;t drink, doesn&#39;t smoke, exercises, eats whole healthy foods...but has a couple slices of whole grain bread every day. IMO he would be healthier without it but he&#39;s still healthy.


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    It is not necessarily true that your father would be healthier without the bread. It depends on his insulin sensitivity. If he is insulin sensitive, he might do better on a higher carb diet involving grains. Insulin resistant people tend to do better on low carb diets.


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    If you want carbs, get them in a less poisonous way than eating grains!


  10. #10
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    No one is going to sit down and eat 5 sweet potatoes a day. Well most people aren&#39;t at least.


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