My husband alerted me to this bit on the morning news recently. I then saw the Consumer Reports study.


It's OK to go low-carb

The 2010 edition of the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which we've used as the basis for the diets' nutrition Ratings (available to subscribers), still frowns on eating 10 percent or more of calories from saturated fat from meat and dairy products and more than 35 percent from fats overall. So the Atkins diet, which is 64 percent fat calories overall and 18 percent saturated fat, ends up with only a Fair nutrition score.

But there's more to the story. Evidence is accumulating that refined carbohydrates promote weight gain and type 2 diabetes through their effects on blood sugar and insulin. "If you have insulin resistance, your insulin may go up to 10 or 20 times normal in order to control your blood sugar after you eat sugar or carbs," says Eric C. Westman, M.D., an associate professor of medicine at Duke University who co-wrote the newest version of the Atkins diet. "But the insulin also tells your body to make and store fat. When you restrict carbs, your insulin goes down and you can burn your body fat, so you eat fewer calories and aren't as hungry."

Isn't it dangerous to eat so much fat? That's still a subject of vigorous scientific debate, but it's clear that fat is not the all-round villain we've been taught it is. Several epidemiology studies have found that saturated fat doesn't seem to increase people's risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke. Other studies suggest that you might be even better off if you replace saturated fat with unsaturated fat instead of with certain carbs, the ones that turn to blood sugar quickly after you eat them, such as white bread and potatoes.

A nutrition researcher, Frank B. Hu, M.D., of the Harvard School of Public Health, recently wrote that he believes "refined carbohydrates are likely to cause even greater metabolic damage than saturated fat in a predominantly sedentary and overweight population."

Moreover, clinical studies have found that an Atkins or Atkins-like diet not only doesn't increase heart-disease risk factors but also actually reduces them as much as or more than low-fat, higher-carb diets that produce equivalent weight loss.

the full report