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  1. #1
    lev96's Avatar
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    making beef stock from a strange start

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    This one is a bit unusual. I made some beef ribs the other day, and boiled them first before putting them on the grill. However, I didn't boil them in water. I boiled them in apple juice and store bought chix broth. I also added salt, spices, and herbs. After they were done boiling, I saved the leftover broth.

    Also, the bones from the ribs were eaten/picked fairly clean, but there is probably some bbq sauce left in the crevices. I was thinking about scrubbing the bones clean to get any leftover bbq sauce off and then boiling them in the leftover broth for a while (how long I don't know...) Then, I would freeze the stuff and use it for beef broth again in the future. Is that safe and if so, do you think it would even taste right given the strange start? Also, if it would work, how long should I boil the bones? Thanks for any help!

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    lev96's Avatar
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    right now i'm simmering the bones (there were only about 6 or 7) in the liquid again (about 2 quarts) I added more water so the bones were fully covered, then some carrots, celery leaves, a bay leaf and some onion. I was planning on simmering for about 5 hours. but I'm worried about the liquid evaporating too much. So when I think it gets too low, I've added a bit of water here and there.

    Please someone stop me if I'm doing this the wrong way and I'll be left with stuff that doesn't taste right. Or if it is unsafe to reuse the store bought stuff and apple juice that I started with.

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    Meadow's Avatar
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    You are probably fine. Make sure you simmer it really low, like barely a roll on the surface if possible to prevent as much evaporation as you can. You can put a lid on the pot (angled so not totally sealed), and it might help your evaporation issue, but this only works if you can turn the heat down far enough.

    The longer you can cook down the bones the more it will extract from them....I usually go 24-36 hours on my beef stocks. Sounds like you are making a small batch though, so hard to cook it down that long safely. Because you don't have any joint bones (like oxtail or knuckle bones), and the marrow is pretty hard in ribs, it won't be quite as flavorful and will not 'gel' when chilled, but at least you will have some homemade stock

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    JeffC's Avatar
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    Well, I'm kind of a purist on stock/broth and what you describe sounds a little odd for the following reasons. First, starting in apple juice is very unsual, I've never heard of that as a stock base, adding a few TBSP of apple cider to leach nutrients out of the bones yes, but apple juice, I've never heard of that. Second, you also started out using chicken broth. In my experiences, mixing and matching animals has not worked out at all. It may work for others but stock takes time for me to get right and I hate it when something turns out wierd so I usually don't experiment with stock, unlike many other types of cooking where I freely experiment.

    Not a problem to add more water, may want to get it boiling in say a tea kettle first and then add it. Also, you can easily make stock in a crock pot where you don't have to worry about evaporation so much although you will have to add some water. I routinely let me bison bones sit on low for 48 hours in my crock pot before filtering and freezing.

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