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    dgrippin's Avatar
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    conventional diet: what happens?

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    I have read plenty about what happens when one eats excess carbs, and can go on for days about the science of eating paleo, but I have lingering questions regarding how the body processes other nutrients when excess carbs are included:

    When excess carbs are consumed with sufficient amounts of fat and protein, what happens to the fat? Is it stored as fat, expelled as waste, or what?

    When excess carbs are consumed with sufficient amounts of fat and protein, what happens to the protein? Is it used or stored? or is it expelled as waste?

    I guess I'm interested in knowing how everything worked BEFORE low-fat/non-fat crap came into existence.

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    Grumpycakes's Avatar
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    Before low-fat/non-fat crap came into existence, we were eating sensible amounts of natural food and very little vegetable oil like canola, soy and safflower, which really mess with the hormones. They promote estrogen production which turns the body into a fat storage machine. We also didn't have the "6 small meals a day" nonsense that bodybuilders started propagating in the 80s, which led not to people eating 6 small healthy meals but 3 meals and 3 frankenfood snacks.
    You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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    ELCO14's Avatar
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    When someone's diet consists of 60% carbs, the body uses those carbs as energy and not fat. Also, the amount of carbs consumed increases the release of insulin to allow the body's cells to absorb the glucose and store the rest as glycogen.

    Insulin stops the use of fat as an energy source.

    Eat more fat/protein and reduce the glucose load, thus reducing the insulin release.
    Self-realization. I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

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    dgrippin's Avatar
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    Thanks for trying, but so far no one answered my question:

    what happens to the dietary FAT and PROTEIN when carbs are high? do they get stored, used, or what? i.e. when carbs are your primary energy source, and carbs are being stored as body fat, is dietary fat and protein ALSO being stored as body fat? which means HYPER fat gain? I need some scientific clarification here.

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    ELCO14's Avatar
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    Well if the body is using the carbs for fuel then there is no other choice but to store the fat and use the little protein for normal body function.
    Self-realization. I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

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    Let's see if I can answer your question.

    When you ingest fat it will almost always (except extreme cases) be shuttled to your fat cells. When no carbs are consumed and say you consume a fat/protein meal fat goes to your bloodstream to be used for energy and whatever is not needed is stored in your fat cells, protein goes to healing, repair and create new tissue, excess protein in the absence of carbs will go through gluconeogenesis and be converted to glucose so the brain and other organs are fed that little glucose (yes, they can run on ketones but need some glucose too). If you eat high carb and high fat, carbs will be used to refill glycogen in liver and muscles and for energy, fat will go to fat cells straight and be used for energy along with any remaining carbs during fasting periods, protein will go to repair and excess will be wasted (it's too expensive energy wise for the body to convert protein into fatty acids).... It sounds complicated but its not. Eat fat burn fat. Eat carbs burn... well carbs...

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    Your body does not store protein for later use regardless of one's fat or carb intake. If your body can't find enough protein from the digestion process it resorts to catabolizing muscle tissue.

    Fat that is not needed for energy is stored for later use. If you are running a calorie deficit then you won't have a net fat storage where if have a calorie excess, you will store it.

    Carbs convert to sugar and can either be used for energy, stored in the muscles and liver as glycogen, or stored for later use in fat cells for later use. Carbs mostly aren't stored as fat until a body's glycogen stores are full. If you are eating a carb heavy diet though, your glycogen supply will nearly always be close to full and glycogen is closely related to the "water weight" that people loose.

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    KetoGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgrippin View Post
    Thanks for trying, but so far no one answered my question:

    what happens to the dietary FAT and PROTEIN when carbs are high? do they get stored, used, or what? i.e. when carbs are your primary energy source, and carbs are being stored as body fat, is dietary fat and protein ALSO being stored as body fat? which means HYPER fat gain? I need some scientific clarification here.
    Here's my broscientific take on that:
    In case of high carb diet it all comes down to calories in, calories out. If you eat at or below your daily calorie expenditure then it doesn't matter what you eat, none of it will be stored. Once you go beyond your daily calorie needs then any excess fat will be stored as body fat and excess proteins will be excreted, while any remaining carbs that haven't been used to restore muscle and liver glycogen will be converted to lipids and stored for future needs. Going above your daily calorie needs on a high carb diet is very easy. Let's say on average people consume about 300-400g of carbs a day, that's 1200-1600 kcal. If a daily need of an average person (male, 30 yrs old, moderate activity level) is about 2300-2500 kcal a day, then it leaves only about ~1000 kcal to divide between fats and protein. Doing a 50/50 split between those two comes out to about 125g protein, and ~55g fat. Spread that over 3 meals and things get really ugly at trying to keep calories below the maintenance level (along with other things considering such low protein and fat intake).

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    dgrippin's Avatar
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    Thanks Daemon and Keto! Great responses!

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    dgrippin's Avatar
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    One more question:

    How would one ensure that muscle mass is being retained while in a caloric deficit? Would you just have to maintain the .7-1 g protein/LBW? (assuming there is body fat available for additional energy)

    Is it also possible to add muscle mass while in caloric deficit, as long as there are body fat stores that are available for energy? (assuming that we are forcing muscle hypertrophy by lifting heavy things to failure, and giving plenty of rest)

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