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Thread: Coating for chicken? page

  1. #1
    Polecatz's Avatar
    Polecatz is offline Senior Member
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    Coating for chicken?

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    I like to make fried chicken and I sometimes use polenta which I understand is not primal and I was wondering what I can use to coat it instead so I can eat it more and not use corn because a coating gives a nice crunch? Gluten free obvs. I don't get stomach issues with a little bit of corn but just in case it IS dodgy in the long run I want to try an alternative . I think corn is not so ubiquitous here in the UK as it is in the US so maybe thats why it doesn't bother me so much.

    Anyway here is my recipe:

    I marinaded the pieces in buttermilk for 24 hours. OMG it was SO tender afterwards and juicy, it was almost falling apart. I rolled them in polenta and I then fried them in goose fat and the chicken fat I had collected from grilling the skins (which I ate as a starter - happy days ). I added garlic and butter at the end. The treat was I added mustard seed and fennel seeds and the latter give a really unusual taste, like licorice. I thought I would share it as I got that idea from an Indian cook book. You can also steam some green beans and then fry them in butter with these spices too -its really sweet and tasty and quick. It is also nice cold (the chicken) so I am taking it to work to share as I made too much.

  2. #2
    Doddibot's Avatar
    Doddibot is offline Senior Member
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    Chickens come covered in skin, which goes crunchy under high, dry heat. Baste with fat and cook in a hot oven, or sauté the chicken in hot oil.

    If you really want a flour, almond meal/flour is readily available and should work well. Also, French cooking often uses chervil and tarragon with chicken, and those taste somewhat like licorice.
    "Thanks to the combination of meat, calcium-rich leaf foods, and a vigorous life, the early hunter-gatherers were robust, with strong skeletons, jaws, and teeth." - Harold McGee, On Food And Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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    kitana's Avatar
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    My go-to breading choice has become dried, powdered mushrooms. Buy dried mushrooms (I can get a huge bag at the asian market for a couple bucks), put them in the blender or food processor and pulse for a minute or so until they are the consistency and texture of flour (it's pretty quick - I usually do a whole bag and then it's ready whenever I need it). I then add a bit of mustard powder and other seasonings. Coat your chicken and sautee. It's really savory and makes a wonderful coating. I like to use it on seared tuna as well. Warning - it will get much darker than you're used to, but it's not burned.

  4. #4
    Ajax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitana View Post
    My go-to breading choice has become dried, powdered mushrooms. Buy dried mushrooms (I can get a huge bag at the asian market for a couple bucks), put them in the blender or food processor and pulse for a minute or so until they are the consistency and texture of flour (it's pretty quick - I usually do a whole bag and then it's ready whenever I need it). I then add a bit of mustard powder and other seasonings. Coat your chicken and sautee. It's really savory and makes a wonderful coating. I like to use it on seared tuna as well. Warning - it will get much darker than you're used to, but it's not burned.
    Ohhh what a fabulous idea! Does it taste super-mushroomy?

  5. #5
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    I can confirm almond flour works great--I rolled skin-on chicken pieces in egg and then almond flour and fried in coconut oil. The only caution is don't have the pan TOO hot or the almond flour gets quite brown. The taste was awesome.

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    I use crushed up pork rinds and then add seasoning to the mix. So good!

  7. #7
    mayness's Avatar
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    Either almond flour or pork rinds. I like the pork rinds better, but sometimes I don't have them on hand or I'm too lazy to crush them. =P
    "mayness, you need to have a siggy line that says "Paleo Information Desk" or something!" -FMN <3

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  8. #8
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    Almond flour mixed with mustard.
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    "We have all the food groups- meat and chocolate".

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    Cheapo parmesan cheese is fabulous! Dip chiken or fish in beaten egg, then cheese, then saute or deep fry. Awesome!

  10. #10
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    I also do almond flour. I mix it with dried coconut, paprika, salt, pepper and garlic powder. Makes epic chicken tenders when fried in coconut oil.
    A steak a day keeps the doctor away.


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