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Thread: Egg White Protein Powder? page

  1. #1
    m e g a n foxy's Avatar
    m e g a n foxy is offline Senior Member
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    Egg White Protein Powder?

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    Anyone use this? I'd like to use it in a shake to up my protein a bit post workout. I know, I could fry some eggs or other meat and such, but I'm just curious. Also, I don't want to use whey, but I read on one of Mark's posts eggs white's can be allergens? I don't want to develop an allergy to them so I was wondering if anyone else has used them with success?
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  2. #2
    Ideal Peace's Avatar
    Ideal Peace is offline Senior Member
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    I've been downing 2 32oz containers of Egg Whites a week (only 500 calories for the entire container), they're only ingredient is protein, and they're pasteurized meaning you can drink them raw (or put into a smoothie raw). I don't use the powdered stuff, but they're usually made in the same plants.
    I've heard on the allergen front that if you only consume egg whites for a long time, you're body begins to have trouble breaking down the protein without the other proteins that would normally be found in the yolk.

    So I just make sure to consume regular eggs 3-4 times a week. Worst case scenario is that you could stop consuming eggs for a few weeks and the "food intolerance" (not really an allergy) can be cleared up.

  3. #3
    yodiewan's Avatar
    yodiewan is offline Senior Member
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    @Ideal Peace: Depending on the temperature that the whites are pasteurized at, you may want to reconsider eating them raw: Avidin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Avidin (found in egg whites) binds to biotin (vitamin B7). Cooking inactivates it, but only to a degree depending on how cooked the white is. See the last section on how even boiling for two mintues, there was still 40% of the binding activity as compared to raw egg white.

    @Meganfoxy: I imagine the heat used in producing a powder would inactivate the avidin, but I could be wrong. Other than that, I don't think there'd be an issue with using it.

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