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Thread: Leaner cuts of beef...How do you prepare them?

  1. #1
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    Leaner cuts of beef...How do you prepare them?

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    Hi guys. I am all about a good rib eye and prime rib. But they get a little pricey especially if you are buying primarily grass fed cuts. The london broil and other leaner cuts are much cheaper but I am wondering if I can prepare them the same way without it getting too "chewy". Obviously since they have less fat they will naturally be a little tougher so I am wondering how you guys prepare it and make it real yummy. Normally for a rib eye I will sear both sides on a pan and then throw it in the oven to lock in the juices. I normally cook it in ghee or coconut oil. But for the leaner cuts of beef I don't have the slightest clue on how to prepare it. Any ideas from the MDA family?
    "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

    People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

  2. #2
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    grill it
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  3. #3
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    Grill it? How about cooking times and temperature? Does it come out tender?
    "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

    People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

  4. #4
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    Eye of round roast is really good cooked low and slow in a crockpot. Sear on all sides in a frying pan, cook some mushrooms, onions, and garlic in the same pan. Put the beef in the crockpot with your favourite seasonings (I use worcestershire, beef oxo cube, salt and pepper) and about 1/2 cup of hot water, then throw the mushroom mix on top and cook all day.
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  5. #5
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    Braise it and cook it low and slow...

  6. #6
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    I like to slice it real thin while still partially frozen and throw it in a skillet with veggies...boom, fajita-stir-fry-whatever

  7. #7
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    Great suggestions I will give them a try. I have done the pot roast which almost always turns out well. But for a quick fix when I am in a jam I think I am going to try the thinly sliced fajita syle cuts.
    "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

    People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Australia
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    Grind it and coat with lard.

    Not all of the cheap cuts are less fatty. Tongue and oxtail are good examples.
    "Thanks to the combination of meat, calcium-rich leaf foods, and a vigorous life, the early hunter-gatherers were robust, with strong skeletons, jaws, and teeth." - Harold McGee, On Food And Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  9. #9
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    I cooked a london broil recently. I covered it in cilantro, garlic, cumin and some other spices then broiled it for ~4-5 minutes per side (came out medium rare to medium). Then I sliced it thinly across the grain.

    So basically two tips
    1. Don't overcook (unless you're cooking low and slow)
    2. Slice thinly across the grain

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