Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 42

Thread: Primal blueprint as asceticism? page 2

  1. #11
    bobbylight's Avatar
    bobbylight Guest

    1

    Shop Now


    Honestly, I think my views on deprivation changed after reading Gandhi's autobiography. Gandhi would do all sorts of fasts and give up different things in his life. While reading the book I would always think "Why is he doing this, what does it accomplish?" But after a while, I started realizing that it can accomplish a lot.


    Basically, in my opinion, to be a good person you should really try to be as nice and helpful to people as much as you can.


    Basically, I think if you eliminate your physical desires, you will see things how they really are...its a pretty eastern concept but it seems to make the most sense.


  2. #12
    JulieD's Avatar
    JulieD Guest

    1



    For me, becoming a "better person" involves actually giving myself a break from time to time. My life has been, and still is, filled with "I should be doing x, y, and z" and enforcing all sorts of rules that do nothing but make me miserable and feeling guilty in the long run.


    My goal is to enjoy life and achieve wellness, and I think both go hand in hand.


  3. #13
    animalcule's Avatar
    animalcule is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    247

    1



    It's definitely not for me as I've never been one who got a lot of fulfillment/pleasure from food, or intoxicating substances. So eating to live, and not drinking etc is normal for me and what feels right.


    But meat, cream, butter, eggs, fruit and veg, tastes much better to me than the crap I ate before (mostly because it was convenient). These are the foods I preferred as a child, before I started taking poor care of myself as a depressed teenager.


    I also feel better in general eating this way, which gives me more pleasure in other aspects of life.


  4. #14
    SerialSinner's Avatar
    SerialSinner is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    286

    1



    We all have our own personal idea of happiness, because we are all unique.


    Some people adhere to a borrowed, arbitrary moral code not because it makes them happy, but because of social pressure, guilt, early indoctrination, culture, peer-pressure, etc.


    The idea of pursuing a collective goal based on adherence to a moral code that promotes self-sacrifice for a collective cause is attractive and usually a "social tacit default". We are told that the benefits will eventually come back to us, resulting in increased happiness on the long-term. I believe this is not true.


    There appears to always be people behind arbitrary moral codes, and that these people are the ones who, coincidentally, reap the most benefits of the "collective causes".


    When I think about socially-enforced moral codes based on abstinence, deprivation and service to others, I cant help thinking of two words: herd-mentality and mass-control.


    I do, on the other hand, believe and strongly pursue reciprocal altruism as a path to happiness. But note the word "reciprocal" though. I think it is key.

    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

  5. #15
    bobbylight's Avatar
    bobbylight Guest

    1



    Is sacrifice for your own good really herd mentality? Well I don't think it is at all, at least not in the west. In America at least, society seems to push materialism and living in excess. People fantasize about being rich because they can buy all sorts of things they want. I think this is a lot more of a herd mentality than sacrificing for pleasure.


    Anyway, I think that there are some spiritual truths out there that cannot be realized if you are focusing on quenching your thirst for physical pleasure. Basically it is a very hindu/jain/buddhist line of thinking. I think true happiness lies in putting a lesser emphasis on physical pleasures and more on exploring your own mind.


    You will always have your mind with you, but you will be put in situations where alcohol, sex, and decadent foods are not available to you.


  6. #16
    frogfarm's Avatar
    frogfarm is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    trudgin' across the tundra, mile after mile
    Posts
    45

    1



    If it's ascetic to not eat things you want to eat, I don't qualify. I may have stopped eating them as an experiment, but I no longer have any desire to eat them!


  7. #17
    Katt's Avatar
    Katt is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Sanford, FL
    Posts
    316

    1



    Ah.. metaphysics...


    Peer pressure and herd mentality is readily visible in every culture. This is no less true of the ascetic East as it is in the materialistic West.

    Start weight: 250 - 06/2009
    Current weight: 199
    Goal: 145

  8. #18
    Shine's Avatar
    Shine is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    53

    1

    [quote]

    "Asceticism...describes a lifestyle characterized by abstinence from various sorts of worldly pleasures (especially sexual activity and consumption of alcohol) often with the aim of pursuing religious and spiritual goals."
    </blockquote>


    The primal blueprint does not preach abstinence from worldly pleasures. In fact, the primal blueprint actually encourages worldly pleasures in its exclusion of sugars and grains. These substances are detrimental to the body and ultimately cause illness, discomfort, and a consequent lack of physical pleasure. Do not confuse abstinence from a savory poison with abstinence from a healthy luxury.


    Would you consider abstinence from cigarettes to be asceticism when the physical pain resulting from the smoking far outweighs the mild pleasure of a nicotine rush? It is the same principle with sugar; the resultant suffering far exceeds the pleasure of consumption.


    Also, I know of no explicit religious or spiritual goals.


  9. #19
    Shazkar's Avatar
    Shazkar is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    12

    1



    shiiiiit, if bacon ain&#39;t a worldy pleasure

    well goddamn


  10. #20
    SerialSinner's Avatar
    SerialSinner is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    286

    1

    PrimalCon New York


    I believe in pursuing happiness through cow-pooling

    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •