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Thread: Yak page

  1. #1
    loy2scully's Avatar
    loy2scully is offline Junior Member
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    Yak

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    This may sound odd, but has anyone ever heard of eating Yak? If so, do you know if it's nutritious? Or any good? There's a fabulous farmers market here in Portland, and one of the vendors specializes in "exotic" meats. Most of them are buffalo, venison, rabbit, and pheasant, things like that, but their oddest meat is Yak. I'm just wondering if there are thoughts...

  2. #2
    Eklecktika's Avatar
    Eklecktika is offline Senior Member
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    It tastes like chicken. ba-daBing.

    from google: Why Chose Yakmeat for your red beef needs

    Newest: This is a brand new exotic meat offering in North America!! A Must Try!! Ya Gotta Try Yak, so You'll Always Come Back!!!

    Tastiest: This is a sweet and delicately flavored red meat. Yak is juicier than buffalo and elk, and never gamey. It is lighter tasting than beef, never greasy. This all-natural premium lean meat is never bland or mushy. This most desirable flavor and "feel" for discerning palettes come from its lean tender meat and natural oils. Once you try Yak, you'll be back!! Our Cryovac clear packaging extends shelf life and enhances freshness. You can taste the sweet difference of our premium quality, aged meats; without the heavy chemical flavors from saturated fats, growth enhancers, and environmental pollutants. You will love it......... But only if you are willing to try it!!

    Healthiest: Healthier to eat than skinless chicken and most fish!! Yes, that's right!! This naturally ultralean dark red meat (95% to 97% fat free overall) is very juicy due to it's high percentages of Omega 3 oils, CLA's ( Conjugated Linoleic Acids ), Oleic Acids,and Stearic Acids, (35% higher than beef as a percentage of fats that are good for us). At the same time, Yak meat is very low in Palmitic Acid which is bad for us (30% less than beef as a percentage of fats, and 120% less than beef as a percentage of meat). Yak remains higher in protein, solids, minerals, and vitamins than beef; while scoring much lower in saturated fats, cholesteral, triglycerides, and calories than beef !!

    NO additives, NO growth hormones, NO steroids, NO fed antibiotics, NO fed animal by-products, NO artificial colors, NO chemical residues, NO mercury contamination (as in most fish), NOTHING ARTIFICIAL, yields an All-Natural meat without contaminants. High Rocky Mountain grazing on lush meadows, irrigated with pristine headwaters, raised by American families produces uncontaminated meat from pampered, unstressed animals. The health and longevity of the Himalayan Peoples are attributed to their eating Yak as their primary food source.

    Environment Friendly Practices: Our grazing practices encourage enlarged and improved grasslands and native herb meadows, as well as reparation of all riparian areas. Our Yaks are raised under humane and even idyllic conditions by family ranchers who care for the environment and the animals. We pasture finish (no feedlots) and process locally (USDA inspected facilities and processing)!!
    Culinary Concepts -- Cooking Creativity

    Yak Steaks, Filets, and Burgers: To keep that sweet, delicate, juicy flavor; do not over heat!! Yak steaks, filets, and burgers finish faster on the grill, in the pan, or in the oven than beef. In order to fully appreciate the taste and juiciness of this flavorful delicacy, do not finish beyond medium rare. In fact, you should remove Yak from the heat at rare, so it will finish to medium rare on the plate on its own. If you desire rare Yak on the plate, remove from heat while still red in the center. Yak never has a "bloody" flavor associated with rare beef.

    Filets from Loins: We recommend you process whole Yak Loins, whether Tenderloins, Strip Loins, Ribeyes, or Sirloins, into, Filets rather than Steaks for two reasons. The first is for better heat control. Yak finishes so quickly, it's easy to overcook a flat steak. The second is to allow removal of all silverskin and connective tissues before cooking. Even though Yak meats are very tender and juicy, as compared to lean beef or buffalo, the connective tissues are quite tough.

    Flavor Enhancements: For optimum enjoyment of this sweet, delicate Yak meat, use only mild flavor enhancing condiments like salt, pepper, garlic, etc. For Yak burgers we recommend a toasted bun with lettuce, tomato, and mayo or Ranch dressing. For Yak Filets use a Bernaise sauce, a Hollandaise sauce , or a fruit sauce such as apricot, peach, apple, cherry and plum.

    Never overpower the delicate taste of Mountain Exotic Gourmet™ Brand Yak meat.

    Pot Roasts: Yak Pot Roasts are exceptionally flavorful and extremely healthy to eat, but can take longer to cook than beef roasts to break down the toughness of the connective tissues. We recommend cooking Yak roasts with steam or water for 1 & 1/2 times as long as you would beef.

    Never microwave Yak meats!! The microwaves change the chemistry and the flavor and the smell of this wonderful delicate meat.

    Smoked Sausages: Yak Smoked Sausages are extremely lean and only need to be reheated to eat and enjoy! We recommend steaming or boiling to reheat and eat!
    I would anticipate cooking to be very similar to a range (as opposed to a flatland/grassland) elk/moose-probably pretty easy to make it resembly shoe leather, but done right, yummy.

    I'd try it.

    The meat I'm keen to try is pheasant. I think in my next life I'll have a few different types of birds. And a peacock. I want a peacock.
    Chief cook & bottle washer for one kid, a dog, 6 hens, 2 surprise! roosters, two horses, and a random 'herd' of quail.

    ~The ultimate ignorance is the rejection of something one knows nothing about and refuses to investigate~

  3. #3
    spughy's Avatar
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    Pheasant is good, but not as succulent as duck or goose. If you do peacock, would you do the full-on medieval roast-then-put-the-feathers-back-on thing? Cause that would be way cool. (Not food-safe. But cool.)

    The yak sounds good. I think it's a safe bet that any herbivore raised on pasture is going to be just fine.

  4. #4
    Catherine's Avatar
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    i've had yak at a himalayan restaurant in durango. I think it was yak raised in colorado, but i'm not 100% sure. Anyway, it tasted too lean to me. I just had a few bites of my husband's dish (he ordered it). I was glad i ordered the lamb.

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    Ellie G's Avatar
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    I've had yak at a Tibetan restaurant and it tasted just like ground beef to me, but it was in a curry, so there was a lot going on.

  6. #6
    spughy's Avatar
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    There probably IS a lot of fat on a yak, but it's probably subcutaneous and around the organs rather than intramuscular. I think the Tibetans or Nepalese or whoever "lives on yaks" actually get the majority of their yak in the form of butter. Which they drink in tea, IIRC. Don't knock it 'til you try it, I guess.

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    hedgehog's Avatar
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    I had yak when I was traveling in Tibet a few years ago. I liked it a lot. I remember it being a bit "gamier" than beef. I never could get used to the taste of the yak butter tea though. I'd like to try it again now that I eat primally. If you can get your hands on some yak, definitely try it!

  8. #8
    Laksmi's Avatar
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    I live amongst a community of Sherpa's and one family has a restaurant that serves Yak. It's very good, yes lean but it's raised on grass and
    clean. I recommend it over goat (we walked for 3 days to 19,000' w/ goats and they were tough eatin')

  9. #9
    fiercehunter's Avatar
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    I bought some today.

  10. #10
    thaijinx's Avatar
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    Ohh! I'd love to try Yak meat.

    I had Yak cheese in Nepal when trekking, ate a whole 500g block in a day. Very tasty.
    SW: 68 kg. * CW: 61.5 kg. * GW: 60 kg or less...
    “Your work is to discover your work and then with all your heart to give yourself to it.” ~ Buddha

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