Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Best wood to use for utensils? page

  1. #1
    Kaylee99's Avatar
    Kaylee99 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    799

    Best wood to use for utensils?

    Shop Now
    Have a pile of wood (mostly fallen branches from an oak and old christmas trees that are nothing but trunks) and was thinking of carving wood spatulas, spoons, and such for cooking. Does anyone know if oak or fir is ok for food? Can't seem to find anything on the web except for bamboo and cedar.
    See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

  2. #2
    supersellen's Avatar
    supersellen is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    892
    We use olive wood utensils and love it, not sure about oak.
    For lots of tasty recipes, check out my blog -http://lifeasadreger.wordpress.com/

  3. #3
    Alex Good's Avatar
    Alex Good is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    The Maritimes
    Posts
    3,576
    I should think fir would be too soft.
    In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

  4. #4
    Kaylee99's Avatar
    Kaylee99 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    799
    Dumb question I know but does oak have anything nasty that could leech into the food? I know they make oak barrels for wine so it must be safe for utensils right?

    I sense Grok rolling his eyes at his descendant's fear of poisoning her family with a wooden spoon. Sorry Grok!
    See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

  5. #5
    Alex Good's Avatar
    Alex Good is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    The Maritimes
    Posts
    3,576
    Oak is fine.
    In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

  6. #6
    naiadknight's Avatar
    naiadknight is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Odessa/ Midland, TX
    Posts
    12,910
    Oak is good, fir is way too soft. Don't stain it unless you can find a food safe one. No polyurethane, use a food grade oil instead.
    "No fate but what we make"- Sarah Connor, Terminator 2
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
    My Primal Battle Tome

  7. #7
    Kaylee99's Avatar
    Kaylee99 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    799
    Naiadknight-I was thinking of just rubbing coconut oil, or grapeseed oil in, warming the wood, rub more in, warm the wood, until it wouldn't absorb any more...kinda like how you season cast iron.
    See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

  8. #8
    naiadknight's Avatar
    naiadknight is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Odessa/ Midland, TX
    Posts
    12,910
    Quote Originally Posted by Kaylee99 View Post
    Naiadknight-I was thinking of just rubbing coconut oil, or grapeseed oil in, warming the wood, rub more in, warm the wood, until it wouldn't absorb any more...kinda like how you season cast iron.
    That's what I'd recommend. I used olive oil on the chopsticks I made, it worked out well.
    "No fate but what we make"- Sarah Connor, Terminator 2
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
    My Primal Battle Tome

  9. #9
    Lynna's Avatar
    Lynna is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Newark, Delaware USA
    Posts
    1,714
    Wooden spoon
    Wooden spoons can be treated to protect from cold liquid absorption with coconut or mineral oil. Edible drying oils such as hempseed oil, walnut oil, and flax oil are used to create a more durable finish. For best results drying oils should be given adequate time to polymerize after application before the spoon is used. Other vegetable oils should be avoided because they will undergo rancidification and leech into food during use. If the wood grain raises up after boiling or washing a light sanding and application of coconut oil will prevent the spoon from becoming fuzzy and harboring bacteria.
    The following site gives instructions for making your own.
    How to Carve a Wooden Spoon

    Some info I found suggests olive, oak, Osage orange (a very hard wood). Of course bamboo
    Last edited by Lynna; 04-22-2011 at 05:43 AM.

  10. #10
    Kaylee99's Avatar
    Kaylee99 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    799
    Thanks Lynna!
    See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •