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Thread: The Human Body Is Built for Distance page 2

  1. #11
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    I mentioned once the the urdu killed in that video was no doubt brought back to the village via Land Rover.


    Just the other day a small egret here had grabbed an anole (small lizard, there are thousands of here) and pretty soon two larger birds were chasing him, first on the ground and then flying in hopes of transferring his little snack.


  2. #12
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    SS - I agree. If paleo man hit the wall right after he got the food, he'd be done. There would need to be a substantial amount of gas left in the tank to make it home.


    More idle thoughts - Taking a whole carcass back to camp might have been a good strategy when there was a group with weapons or fire, but before there were weapons or fire in the mix I'm guessing that scavenging was a "drive through" situation. Grab what you can and go.


    OtB - no doubt that urdu was taken back in the Land Rover. The Land Rover's probably also what kept the vultures and other scavengers at bay while the hunter performed his ceremony.


  3. #13
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    "Cardio" causes heart disease, from Kurt Harris at PaleoNu:


    http://www.paleonu.com/panu-weblog/2009/11/1/cardio-causes-heart-disease.html


    Discussion of a study on marathon runners.


  4. #14
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    Fascinating article. Guess all those heart attack victims didn't get the message that they were b...b...b...born to run.


  5. #15
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    I hope the researchers take advantage of the incredible recent growth in ultramarathoning to evaluate how ultra runners fare in the health department.


  6. #16
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    There wasn't anything much really new in that article that we didn't go through here:


    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...e-the-shoes%29


    I think Primalchild has it spot on, as walking could explain everything listed in the article. There was nothing that seemed to leap out as being specific to running long distances
    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

  7. #17
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    Hopefully, as the blogosphere grows, fields resulting from the overlap of evolutionary biology and other health-related disciplines, like Evolutionary Medicine, for example, will get more attention by the scientific community.

    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

  8. #18
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    Just for kicks I pulled out my copy of Cordain's and Friel's "The Paleo Diet for Athletes." On pp. 181-3 there is an interesting account of Dr. Kim Hill's experience hunting with the Ache and Hiwi tribes of South America back in the 1980s. Too long to reproduce in it's entirety here, but some highlights:


    Ache - Hunted almost every day (only rain kept them in). Averaged about 10 km of fast hiking (~1.5 km/hr) through the rugged jungle in pursuit with another 1-2 km per day in "very rapid pursuit." Occasionally their hunts included "fast trots" through the jungle (~3 km/hr) for over 2 hours while in pursuit. Total time each day about 7-9 hours, but hard days were followed by easier days. Dr. Kim was a former college football wide receiver, and, at the time of these hunts, he was a well trained long distance runner. He says the Ache could "run him into the ground" on their hunts and some of the Ache men could sprint faster than him.


    Hiwi - Hunted only 2-3 days a week and wouldn't go out if they were "tired." Travel during their hunts was not as strenuous as the Ache and their pursuits were shorter. However the Hiwi would regularly go on long walks of 80-100 km to visit another village, stay for just a few hours and then return home - walking all through the day and night.


    Dr. Kim makes a point to note that these tribes of hunter-gatherers were not superhumans: "They are what you would expect if you took a genetic cross section of humans and put them in lifetime physical training at moderate to hard levels."


  9. #19
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    Thanks, Geoff.


    Dangerous, of course, to generalize from two snapshots to the species, but maybe the best we can do.


    Still sounds like running is something we CAN do, and often HAVE to to, but not something we SHOULD do.


  10. #20
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    OtB - Completely agree about being careful not to generalize. Just interesting to note that the behavior patterns Dr. Hill describes seem more akin to fast hiking with bursts of sprinting, not jogging. From Dr. Hill's description it sounds as if the Ache were bushwhacking through the dense tropical rain forest without a machete. It wasn't a distance run on single track trails. Under those conditions 3 km/hr would be quite a workout. Note also that the Hiwi took long walks - they didn't run ultradistances. As Mark noted, running ultradistances like the Tarahumara requires a significant source of carbs that were largely unavailable to the Ache and Hiwi. It could be that long distance running is (largely) a post-agricultural phenomenon.


    (BTW - my bad in the prior post going with "Dr. Kim")


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