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Thread: Cycling, primal and weight loss page

  1. #1
    about time's Avatar
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    Cycling, primal and weight loss

    I'm returning to competitive cycling after a very long break - 10 and 25 mile time trials and possibly the odd 50.

    I started off very overweight at 250 pounds at 6'5". Over the past three months I have dropped to 220 pounds. My goal is to get another 10-12 pounds off, because I know this gets me into a nice power/weight balance for the short time trials.

    I have been observing primal closely. My cycling hours are now increasing nicely. This week I will have done 6 hours in the saddle, of which most of it is at 80% of max HR, with one session having some 90% intervals in it. I reckon I can plan things to get to a regular 6-8 hour training week.

    I have been tracking calories using 1500 as a daily base to give me a two pound a week loss. On training days I'm tending to take in maybe 2,200 calories, which should be fine as an hour on the bike is telling me 1200-1300 used. I'm not taking any carbs for the training - gels and sports drinks are out - just a scoop of protein powder in water after each ride.

    My problem is that my weight is stuck at 220 and I don't get it - my training and therefore calories out is going well; I'm pretty much primal, perhaps a little too much dairy, but nothing extreme; I'm not throwing down too many calories on non-training days. But I'm stuck ... doesn't make sense.

    Any ideas please? - I was hoping to drop the weight so I could start taking in a little carb as my training rides extend .... I can see it becoming a training block. Also at 220 I'm not going to scare any stopwatches.

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    belinda's Avatar
    belinda is offline Senior Member
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    I'm not an expert and I've only been doing this for six weeks so take it for what it's worth, but from what I've been reading, I'd think that you're not taking in enough calories and your metabolism is slowing down the fat burning.

    Most of the endurance/high intensity athletes seem to make sure to have a sweet potato or something after they train and you certainly can afford a couple of hundred calories and 100g of carbs if you've just burned of 1200 in an hour on the bike. The ZC protein shake probably isn't cutting it.

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    TriCiCi's Avatar
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    More food and more intervals. The steady state 80% of max HR is not going to help you get faster or lose weight. You need to push at that power threshold with some serious intensity and eat some more freakin' food. I'm a 5'8" female triathlete and I eat way more than you do. Intensity rides, slow cadence/high power strength work, a once a week long ride for aerobic conditioning purposes, and some additional bodyweight training will turn you into a lean, mean, time trial machine.

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    Karma's Avatar
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    Agree with TriCiCi. At only 10-50 mile TT distance you need to up the interval intensity and frequency. Get that v02 max up and your tt times will come down along with the fat % you are hanging onto. Sweet Potatoes are going to be a huge part of your diet during your training and recovery. I sure hope you like them. A simple 30' warm up with a 60' effort at FTP (threshold power) once a week will condition your aerobic engine plenty. I live primally and race with a hybrid approach to fueling (outlined in Paleo Diet for Athletes by Joe Freil & Loren Cordain) and it works great.

    I am training a team of atheltes right now and 8 of them are 90%-100% paleo copmplient using the hybrid racing model as well. It's very easy to understand and follow.

    Good Luck.

    Dave
    USA Cycling Level 2 coach
    USA Triathlon Level 2 coach

  5. #5
    about time's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, really useful .... more calories already implemented. This morning I did turbo intervals, which was enjoyable (in that perverse interval sort of way!)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Karma View Post
    I live primally and race with a hybrid approach to fueling (outlined in Paleo Diet for Athletes by Joe Freil & Loren Cordain) and it works great.

    I am training a team of atheltes right now and 8 of them are 90%-100% paleo copmplient using the hybrid racing model as well. It's very easy to understand and follow.

    Good Luck.

    Dave
    USA Cycling Level 2 coach
    USA Triathlon Level 2 coach
    Dave - what is this hybrid approach you are talking about? Usable for other sports? I dont want to go ahead and buy a book yet...could you give me any details please?

  7. #7
    Karma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ciri View Post
    Dave - what is this hybrid approach you are talking about? Usable for other sports? I dont want to go ahead and buy a book yet...could you give me any details please?
    Pre ride/race I will use a mixture of sweet potato, cashews and banana for topping off my glycogen stores. During the actual event (and training sessions that exceed two hours) I will fuel will a limited anount of solid food ( a banan here and there or a par cooked yam) and rely heavily upon sports grinks with added maltodextrin, electrolyte supplements and sports gels as my primary source of fuel.

    Following a long bout of racing/exercising, I will refuel with some added whey protein in my recovery smoothie. (lots of berries, whey protein, almond milk, ice and coconut milk, macadamia nut oil and a another yam).

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    Dave, how would you fuel for a long event like a 300-600k brevet? Well, I guess you could eat more "normal" food in an event of that duration. I can still remember a piece of gas station fried chicken I had sometime after 300 miles in a 600k that was one of the most memorable, heavenly, delicious pieces of food I have ever eaten.

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    I have found that you have to be careful with any exercise that puts you in the 75% - 90% MHR range for an extended time. I used to run in this range every day and it stalled my weight loss for 6 months. I have seen it happen many times with others runners also. YMMV.

  10. #10
    Karma's Avatar
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    @ Nanci. In Brevet riding you are going to need to fuel for the long haul and since your intensity is MUCH lower than a 3 hour "race", you can do it with a lot more solid food. I have stopped at a Costco during a 200k training ride and downed an entire rotisserie chicken and three cokes while the lunch court got really quiet around me. Yams & Bananas would be a staple of my long rides if I were you. Throw in some high quality Jerkeymixed with macadamia nuts & cashews too. On super long rides I also supplement with some branch chain amionio acid powder (1 tsp/ bottle) and I find that I can go a little longer without feeling as much fatigue. Is all this long working out primal per say? NO. Do I find it enjoyable? YES. Is there a middle ground? I sure think so.

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